When Lungers Came to Tucson: Seeking Recovery and Discovering Tuberculosis as a Social Disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243890
Title:
When Lungers Came to Tucson: Seeking Recovery and Discovering Tuberculosis as a Social Disease
Author:
Hart, Thomas Aloysius
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries witnessed a massive migration of "health seekers," who traveled to the Western Frontier in search of health. This migration was responsible for one in four permanent settlers to the frontier during this period. Among the many respiratory illnesses that health seekers suffered from, tuberculosis was the most prevalent and the most deadly disease in America. Tucson, Arizona was one of the most popular and famous "health resorts" because medical thinking praised sunshine, dry air, and open space for healing diseases like tuberculosis. But during the height of health seeker migration, medical thought changed drastically with scientific discoveries such as the isolation of the tubercle bacillus, which was an early validation of the germ theory. As a result, society altered its approaches to healing disease, but only a minority of people were able to enjoy the advancement in medical practices: the wealthy. Nationwide, tuberculosis became a social disease by 1900, and Tucson’s unique experience brings this fact into light. Eventually, there were two classes of tuberculosis sufferers in Tucson: the wealthy class, and the destitute one. Changes in science, as well as the realities of the Southwest, first provoked migration to Tucson, and then discouraged it. Nevertheless, Tucson both endured and benefited from health seekers as its community battled against a social disease.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWhen Lungers Came to Tucson: Seeking Recovery and Discovering Tuberculosis as a Social Diseaseen_US
dc.creatorHart, Thomas Aloysiusen_US
dc.contributor.authorHart, Thomas Aloysiusen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries witnessed a massive migration of "health seekers," who traveled to the Western Frontier in search of health. This migration was responsible for one in four permanent settlers to the frontier during this period. Among the many respiratory illnesses that health seekers suffered from, tuberculosis was the most prevalent and the most deadly disease in America. Tucson, Arizona was one of the most popular and famous "health resorts" because medical thinking praised sunshine, dry air, and open space for healing diseases like tuberculosis. But during the height of health seeker migration, medical thought changed drastically with scientific discoveries such as the isolation of the tubercle bacillus, which was an early validation of the germ theory. As a result, society altered its approaches to healing disease, but only a minority of people were able to enjoy the advancement in medical practices: the wealthy. Nationwide, tuberculosis became a social disease by 1900, and Tucson’s unique experience brings this fact into light. Eventually, there were two classes of tuberculosis sufferers in Tucson: the wealthy class, and the destitute one. Changes in science, as well as the realities of the Southwest, first provoked migration to Tucson, and then discouraged it. Nevertheless, Tucson both endured and benefited from health seekers as its community battled against a social disease.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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