Mexican-American Mothers' Discipline Beliefs and Practices as Predictors of Toddlers' Externalizing Behaviors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243877
Title:
Mexican-American Mothers' Discipline Beliefs and Practices as Predictors of Toddlers' Externalizing Behaviors
Author:
Callahan, Margaret Claire
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Objective.The goal of this study was to determine how the interaction of maternal parenting discipline beliefs and physical punishment behaviors was associated with externalizing behaviors in toddlers. Methods. Data was collected through in-person interviews with 80 Mexican-American mothers with toddlers, reporting about their beliefs about discipline, their use of physical discipline, and their toddlers’ externalizing behaviors. Hierarchal linear regression models were used to examine the relationship between the interaction of beliefs and behaviors and externalizing behaviors, while controlling for maternal depression. Results. The interaction of beliefs and behaviors were significantly correlated with externalizing behaviors. There was a positive correlation between spanking frequency and externalizing behaviors when mothers that reported high levels of discipline beliefs, and a negative correlation between spanking frequency and externalizing behaviors in mothers that reported low levels of discipline beliefs. Conclusion. Beliefs and behaviors must be considered together when examining how they predict externalizing behaviors. It cannot be concluded that spanking alone causes externalizing outcomes in children without examining the context of the punishment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMexican-American Mothers' Discipline Beliefs and Practices as Predictors of Toddlers' Externalizing Behaviorsen_US
dc.creatorCallahan, Margaret Claireen_US
dc.contributor.authorCallahan, Margaret Claireen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective.The goal of this study was to determine how the interaction of maternal parenting discipline beliefs and physical punishment behaviors was associated with externalizing behaviors in toddlers. Methods. Data was collected through in-person interviews with 80 Mexican-American mothers with toddlers, reporting about their beliefs about discipline, their use of physical discipline, and their toddlers’ externalizing behaviors. Hierarchal linear regression models were used to examine the relationship between the interaction of beliefs and behaviors and externalizing behaviors, while controlling for maternal depression. Results. The interaction of beliefs and behaviors were significantly correlated with externalizing behaviors. There was a positive correlation between spanking frequency and externalizing behaviors when mothers that reported high levels of discipline beliefs, and a negative correlation between spanking frequency and externalizing behaviors in mothers that reported low levels of discipline beliefs. Conclusion. Beliefs and behaviors must be considered together when examining how they predict externalizing behaviors. It cannot be concluded that spanking alone causes externalizing outcomes in children without examining the context of the punishment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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