Language Style Matching as a Predictor of Successful Coping in Breast Cancer Patients and Their Partners

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243736
Title:
Language Style Matching as a Predictor of Successful Coping in Breast Cancer Patients and Their Partners
Author:
Ash, Kristen M.
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Past research has shown that the use of function words--such as pronouns--in Language Style Matching accurately predicts relationship satisfaction and success. The current study on breast cancer patients focuses on two main hypotheses. First, we predicted that LSM would correlate positively with relationship satisfaction and this correlation would be unique to the patient-partner relationship. Second, it follows that LSM would positively correlate with successful use of coping mechanisms for breast cancer patients and their partners. We operationalized coping through two questionnaires, the dyadic adjustment scale (DAS) and the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D), assessed longitudinally. The linguistic inquiry word count program (LIWC) software measured LSM by counting function words obtained by the objective sound clips recorded by an electronically activated recorder (EAR). Cancer patients and their partners exhibited high LSM and overall variance was low (.001) within couples (.002) and between friends and family (.061). Personal pronouns correlate with overall satisfaction as reported by partners. Conversely, LSM within couples did not predict depression in partners or patients. Results suggest that in the matter of cancer patients and their partners’ self reported adjustment LSM does not significantly matter.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLanguage Style Matching as a Predictor of Successful Coping in Breast Cancer Patients and Their Partnersen_US
dc.creatorAsh, Kristen M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAsh, Kristen M.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPast research has shown that the use of function words--such as pronouns--in Language Style Matching accurately predicts relationship satisfaction and success. The current study on breast cancer patients focuses on two main hypotheses. First, we predicted that LSM would correlate positively with relationship satisfaction and this correlation would be unique to the patient-partner relationship. Second, it follows that LSM would positively correlate with successful use of coping mechanisms for breast cancer patients and their partners. We operationalized coping through two questionnaires, the dyadic adjustment scale (DAS) and the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D), assessed longitudinally. The linguistic inquiry word count program (LIWC) software measured LSM by counting function words obtained by the objective sound clips recorded by an electronically activated recorder (EAR). Cancer patients and their partners exhibited high LSM and overall variance was low (.001) within couples (.002) and between friends and family (.061). Personal pronouns correlate with overall satisfaction as reported by partners. Conversely, LSM within couples did not predict depression in partners or patients. Results suggest that in the matter of cancer patients and their partners’ self reported adjustment LSM does not significantly matter.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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