Magnetic Resonance Imaging as Non-Invasive Tool for Predicting Success of Islet Transplantation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243735
Title:
Magnetic Resonance Imaging as Non-Invasive Tool for Predicting Success of Islet Transplantation
Author:
Asghar, Aeen Mostafa
Issue Date:
May-2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The success of autologous islet transplantation greatly depends on the total islet yield. Using MRI as a non-invasive tool to determine the volume of the pancreas, the correlation between the calculated volume of the pancreas and the total islet yield has been determined. By using the volume of the pancreas as an indicator of total islet yield, MRI could be used as a predictive tool to determine the success of islet transplants. The data was gathered retrospectively from ten transplant patients, and the volume was determined by freehand contouring of the pancreas on MR images. With only ten patients, no significant correlation could be found between the volume vs. total islet yield, volume vs. IEQ (Islet Equivalent unit), mass vs. total islet yield, and mass vs. IEQ, with correlations of 0.238, 0.139, 0.343, and 0.219, respectively. The lack of correlation between the volume and total islet yield indicates other unaccounted variables such as fibrosis, inflammation, and fatty tissue infiltration that destroy islets but were not included in our volume calculations. Using a new protocol that takes the stated variables into account, we hope to find a better correlation between volume and total islet yield in future studies.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMagnetic Resonance Imaging as Non-Invasive Tool for Predicting Success of Islet Transplantationen_US
dc.creatorAsghar, Aeen Mostafaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAsghar, Aeen Mostafaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe success of autologous islet transplantation greatly depends on the total islet yield. Using MRI as a non-invasive tool to determine the volume of the pancreas, the correlation between the calculated volume of the pancreas and the total islet yield has been determined. By using the volume of the pancreas as an indicator of total islet yield, MRI could be used as a predictive tool to determine the success of islet transplants. The data was gathered retrospectively from ten transplant patients, and the volume was determined by freehand contouring of the pancreas on MR images. With only ten patients, no significant correlation could be found between the volume vs. total islet yield, volume vs. IEQ (Islet Equivalent unit), mass vs. total islet yield, and mass vs. IEQ, with correlations of 0.238, 0.139, 0.343, and 0.219, respectively. The lack of correlation between the volume and total islet yield indicates other unaccounted variables such as fibrosis, inflammation, and fatty tissue infiltration that destroy islets but were not included in our volume calculations. Using a new protocol that takes the stated variables into account, we hope to find a better correlation between volume and total islet yield in future studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry and Molecular Biophysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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