Creative Writing Joins Rhetoric and the Public Arts: A Comparative Study of Craft, Workshop, and Practice Beyond English Studies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/243114
Title:
Creative Writing Joins Rhetoric and the Public Arts: A Comparative Study of Craft, Workshop, and Practice Beyond English Studies
Author:
Ristow, Ben W.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 10-Aug-2014
Abstract:
Creative Writing Joins Rhetoric and the Public Arts: A Comparative Study of Craft, Workshop, and Practice beyond English Studies analyzes the field of creative writing through the lenses of classical rhetorical scholarship, aesthetic theory, and craft criticism in the arts. Through a historical analysis of techne (craft or method) and telos (end or final cause) in the work of Aristotle and Plato, I argue that what we call "craft" often suffers from a limiting definition that privileges formal and material constraints over the more vital concerns of knowledge and consciousness reflected in artistic education. Craft knowledge is demonstrated through the processes of art-making internalized by the student apprentice. No matter the form or discipline, craft practice embodies the processes and consciousness that make art education possible. The dissertation analyzes concepts of craft as technique while revealing how artistic method illuminates the ends to which art serves. Craft consciousness, a term outlined in this dissertation, is defined as an awareness of artistic method and practice across disciplinary boundaries. If applied by teachers and students of creative writing, this consciousness will redefine writing workshop, curriculum design, programmatic elements, and the mission of creative writing as an academic discipline. By shifting the field toward the craft principles shared with the performing and fine arts, the dissertation uses rhetoric and public arts as lenses for reimagining the mission of creative writing more broadly as a discipline simultaneously engaged with democratic and occultic principles. In proposing an alternative approach to traditional writing workshop by examining author-function, this dissertation also draws from Paulo Freire's term "nuclei of contradiction" in order to argue for a pedagogy that attends to the inherent contradictions that form the foundation of creative writing culture. Freire's "critical consciousness" informs the term "craft consciousness" and the latter term forms the scaffolding in which to reimagine educational principles in creative writing. In order to reimagine craft and workshop practices in traditional and virtual spaces, this dissertation examines how theories, histories, and practices in craft will transform creative writing into a field grounded in artistic practice and intellectual inquiry.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
creative writing; pedagogy; rhetoric; writing workshop; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; arts education; craft
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCreative Writing Joins Rhetoric and the Public Arts: A Comparative Study of Craft, Workshop, and Practice Beyond English Studiesen_US
dc.creatorRistow, Ben W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRistow, Ben W.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 10-Aug-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractCreative Writing Joins Rhetoric and the Public Arts: A Comparative Study of Craft, Workshop, and Practice beyond English Studies analyzes the field of creative writing through the lenses of classical rhetorical scholarship, aesthetic theory, and craft criticism in the arts. Through a historical analysis of techne (craft or method) and telos (end or final cause) in the work of Aristotle and Plato, I argue that what we call "craft" often suffers from a limiting definition that privileges formal and material constraints over the more vital concerns of knowledge and consciousness reflected in artistic education. Craft knowledge is demonstrated through the processes of art-making internalized by the student apprentice. No matter the form or discipline, craft practice embodies the processes and consciousness that make art education possible. The dissertation analyzes concepts of craft as technique while revealing how artistic method illuminates the ends to which art serves. Craft consciousness, a term outlined in this dissertation, is defined as an awareness of artistic method and practice across disciplinary boundaries. If applied by teachers and students of creative writing, this consciousness will redefine writing workshop, curriculum design, programmatic elements, and the mission of creative writing as an academic discipline. By shifting the field toward the craft principles shared with the performing and fine arts, the dissertation uses rhetoric and public arts as lenses for reimagining the mission of creative writing more broadly as a discipline simultaneously engaged with democratic and occultic principles. In proposing an alternative approach to traditional writing workshop by examining author-function, this dissertation also draws from Paulo Freire's term "nuclei of contradiction" in order to argue for a pedagogy that attends to the inherent contradictions that form the foundation of creative writing culture. Freire's "critical consciousness" informs the term "craft consciousness" and the latter term forms the scaffolding in which to reimagine educational principles in creative writing. In order to reimagine craft and workshop practices in traditional and virtual spaces, this dissertation examines how theories, histories, and practices in craft will transform creative writing into a field grounded in artistic practice and intellectual inquiry.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcreative writingen_US
dc.subjectpedagogyen_US
dc.subjectrhetoricen_US
dc.subjectwriting workshopen_US
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
dc.subjectarts educationen_US
dc.subjectcraften_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Ken S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeming, Alisonen_US
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