Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/242453
Title:
Four Part-Songs by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)
Author:
Zosel, Heather
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Herbert Howells (1892-1983), an English composer, was an influential teacher and composer. He wrote in many genres including orchestral works, string quartets, and sacred and secular choral works. As Howells matured into his final compositional period (1945-1983) his style coalesced. Modal inflections were more prevalent, dissonance was harsher with fewer releases of tension, and rhythmic language was increasingly more complex. The four part-songs, Walking in the Snow (1950), The Scribe (1952), Inheritance (1953), and The Summer is Coming (1964), represent Howells' compositional approach in his secular output from this time period, and, through study of the sacred motet Take Him, Earth, for Cherishing (1964), it is evident that the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic complexities found in his sacred works pervade the secular works as well. This document provides in-depth analysis of the four part-songs mentioned above, while paying special attention to specific melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic characteristics found in his sacred music from the same time period.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Partsongs; Music; Choral; Herbert Howells
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chamberlain, Bruce

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFour Part-Songs by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)en_US
dc.creatorZosel, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorZosel, Heatheren_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHerbert Howells (1892-1983), an English composer, was an influential teacher and composer. He wrote in many genres including orchestral works, string quartets, and sacred and secular choral works. As Howells matured into his final compositional period (1945-1983) his style coalesced. Modal inflections were more prevalent, dissonance was harsher with fewer releases of tension, and rhythmic language was increasingly more complex. The four part-songs, Walking in the Snow (1950), The Scribe (1952), Inheritance (1953), and The Summer is Coming (1964), represent Howells' compositional approach in his secular output from this time period, and, through study of the sacred motet Take Him, Earth, for Cherishing (1964), it is evident that the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic complexities found in his sacred works pervade the secular works as well. This document provides in-depth analysis of the four part-songs mentioned above, while paying special attention to specific melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic characteristics found in his sacred music from the same time period.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPartsongsen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectChoralen_US
dc.subjectHerbert Howellsen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChamberlain, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchauer, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrobeck, John T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChamberlain, Bruceen_US
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