Flash Flood Causing Mechanisms of the North American Monsoon System in the Sonoran Desert

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/242451
Title:
Flash Flood Causing Mechanisms of the North American Monsoon System in the Sonoran Desert
Author:
Bieda, Stephen W.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The North American Monsoon System (NAMS) is a significant weather and climate phenomenon that brings critical rainfall to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. As a result of the North American Monsoon Experiment, and research efforts surrounding the field campaign, the understanding of the NAMS has increased considerably over the last 15 years. In addition questions concerning potential flash flood causing mechanisms of the NAMS have not been thoroughly investigated. This dissertation is comprised of two papers that collectively address the aspects of the literary understanding of the NAMS as we know it today and conduct an investigation into the complex interactions between various weather systems that may influence the NAMS. In the first paper, a review of the major research of the NAMS literature since the last comprehensive review 15 years ago is conducted. The results of his review are assessed for where our understanding has been improved and where future research needs to be guided for purposes of the second paper. Based upon the results from the literature review, the second paper focuses on identification of inverted troughs and gulf surges based upon lower- and mid-level atmospheric parameters for purposes of assessing the impacts on National Weather Service Storm Report flash flood dates. This research contributes to the synthesis of the current knowledge of the NAMS in general and to the specific regional impacts that do occur during periods of heavy precipitation over the NAMS region for purposes of improving meteorological predictability of flash flooding. The results can (1) gauge our understanding of the NAMS literature to date and (2) improve meteorological forecasts through the recognition of synoptic and sub-synoptic patterns related to the NAMS that are most likely to cause flash floods.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
inverted trough; North American Monsoon; precipitation; Sonoran Desert; Arid Lands Resource Sciences; flash flood; gulf surges
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Arid Lands Resource Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Comrie, Andrew C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFlash Flood Causing Mechanisms of the North American Monsoon System in the Sonoran Deserten_US
dc.creatorBieda, Stephen W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBieda, Stephen W.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe North American Monsoon System (NAMS) is a significant weather and climate phenomenon that brings critical rainfall to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. As a result of the North American Monsoon Experiment, and research efforts surrounding the field campaign, the understanding of the NAMS has increased considerably over the last 15 years. In addition questions concerning potential flash flood causing mechanisms of the NAMS have not been thoroughly investigated. This dissertation is comprised of two papers that collectively address the aspects of the literary understanding of the NAMS as we know it today and conduct an investigation into the complex interactions between various weather systems that may influence the NAMS. In the first paper, a review of the major research of the NAMS literature since the last comprehensive review 15 years ago is conducted. The results of his review are assessed for where our understanding has been improved and where future research needs to be guided for purposes of the second paper. Based upon the results from the literature review, the second paper focuses on identification of inverted troughs and gulf surges based upon lower- and mid-level atmospheric parameters for purposes of assessing the impacts on National Weather Service Storm Report flash flood dates. This research contributes to the synthesis of the current knowledge of the NAMS in general and to the specific regional impacts that do occur during periods of heavy precipitation over the NAMS region for purposes of improving meteorological predictability of flash flooding. The results can (1) gauge our understanding of the NAMS literature to date and (2) improve meteorological forecasts through the recognition of synoptic and sub-synoptic patterns related to the NAMS that are most likely to cause flash floods.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectinverted troughen_US
dc.subjectNorth American Monsoonen_US
dc.subjectprecipitationen_US
dc.subjectSonoran Deserten_US
dc.subjectArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectflash flooden_US
dc.subjectgulf surgesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorComrie, Andrew C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrimmins, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, D. Philipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuart E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberByerle, Lee A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberComrie, Andrew C.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.