From Geo-Social to Geo-Local: The Flows and Biases of Volunteered Geographic Information

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/242399
Title:
From Geo-Social to Geo-Local: The Flows and Biases of Volunteered Geographic Information
Author:
Stephens, Monica
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation analyzes the geography of information in the 21st century where BigData, social networks, user generated production of content and geography combine to create new and complex patterns of space, context and sociability. Both online and offline, social networks are creating a space that simultaneously unifies individuals and identifies distinct differences in their patterns and their relationships to space. Using methodologies derived from spatial analysis, geographic information systems (GIS), and Social Network Analysis (SNA), this dissertation identifies how Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) both mimic and bolster existing social structures and allow individuals to extend their activities into flows between non-contiguous spaces. Simultaneously it demonstrates how the adoption of user-generated geographic information has not been uniform. Instead it has resulted in an uneven distribution of content and more nuanced digital divides. Although geographically uneven, social structures developed through online networks of user-generated content are most effective at transmitting information at a local level. This dissertation provides a comprehensive examination of online networks and representations of the GeoWeb. It repudiates previous assumptions that online content provides liberation and collaboration among users without regard to geographic constraints and demonstrates the locally constrained nature social networks and the demographically constrained nature of geographic information.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
GeoWeb; online social networks; Volunteered Geographic Infomation; Geography; cartography; Geographic Information Systems
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bailey, Kerion; Zook, Matthew

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFrom Geo-Social to Geo-Local: The Flows and Biases of Volunteered Geographic Informationen_US
dc.creatorStephens, Monicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Monicaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation analyzes the geography of information in the 21st century where BigData, social networks, user generated production of content and geography combine to create new and complex patterns of space, context and sociability. Both online and offline, social networks are creating a space that simultaneously unifies individuals and identifies distinct differences in their patterns and their relationships to space. Using methodologies derived from spatial analysis, geographic information systems (GIS), and Social Network Analysis (SNA), this dissertation identifies how Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) both mimic and bolster existing social structures and allow individuals to extend their activities into flows between non-contiguous spaces. Simultaneously it demonstrates how the adoption of user-generated geographic information has not been uniform. Instead it has resulted in an uneven distribution of content and more nuanced digital divides. Although geographically uneven, social structures developed through online networks of user-generated content are most effective at transmitting information at a local level. This dissertation provides a comprehensive examination of online networks and representations of the GeoWeb. It repudiates previous assumptions that online content provides liberation and collaboration among users without regard to geographic constraints and demonstrates the locally constrained nature social networks and the demographically constrained nature of geographic information.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGeoWeben_US
dc.subjectonline social networksen_US
dc.subjectVolunteered Geographic Infomationen_US
dc.subjectGeographyen_US
dc.subjectcartographyen_US
dc.subjectGeographic Information Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBailey, Kerionen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZook, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristopherson, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTong, Daoqinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Kerionen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZook, Matthewen_US
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