Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238914
Title:
Quantifying the Role of Hydrologic Variability in Soil Carbon Flux
Author:
Stielstra, Clare M.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 31-Jan-2013
Abstract:
Soil carbon (C) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool. While inputs to this system are fairly well constrained, the diverse factors driving soil C efflux remain poorly understood. Carbon in surface soils is mobilized via two distinct pathways: CO₂ gas flux and dissolved C flux. The goal of this study was to quantify the role of hydrologic variability in mobilizing carbon as gaseous and dissolved fluxes from near-surface soils, and to determine their relative magnitudes. Data were collected through 2010 and 2011 from two subalpine sites in Arizona and New Mexico. I observed no significant variability in dissolved fluxes, and these values were low at all sites. In contrast, CO₂ fluxes were large (from 0.22 g C m⁻² d⁻¹ to 5.27 g C m⁻² d⁻¹) and varied between sites and between years. My results suggest that in arid montane forests soil carbon flux is critically linked to water availability.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
DOC; Hydrology; Soil moisture; Soil Respiration; Carbon flux
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brooks, Paul D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleQuantifying the Role of Hydrologic Variability in Soil Carbon Fluxen_US
dc.creatorStielstra, Clare M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStielstra, Clare M.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 31-Jan-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractSoil carbon (C) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool. While inputs to this system are fairly well constrained, the diverse factors driving soil C efflux remain poorly understood. Carbon in surface soils is mobilized via two distinct pathways: CO₂ gas flux and dissolved C flux. The goal of this study was to quantify the role of hydrologic variability in mobilizing carbon as gaseous and dissolved fluxes from near-surface soils, and to determine their relative magnitudes. Data were collected through 2010 and 2011 from two subalpine sites in Arizona and New Mexico. I observed no significant variability in dissolved fluxes, and these values were low at all sites. In contrast, CO₂ fluxes were large (from 0.22 g C m⁻² d⁻¹ to 5.27 g C m⁻² d⁻¹) and varied between sites and between years. My results suggest that in arid montane forests soil carbon flux is critically linked to water availability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectDOCen_US
dc.subjectHydrologyen_US
dc.subjectSoil moistureen_US
dc.subjectSoil Respirationen_US
dc.subjectCarbon fluxen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrooks, Paul D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcIntosh, Jennifer C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChorover, Jonen_US
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