The Role of Path Integration on Neural Activity in Hippocampus and Medial Entorhinal Cortex

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238892
Title:
The Role of Path Integration on Neural Activity in Hippocampus and Medial Entorhinal Cortex
Author:
Navratilova, Zaneta
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis explores the role of path integration on the firing of hippocampal place cells and medial entorhinal grid cells. Grid cells fire at equidistant locations in an environment, indicating that they keep track of the distance and direction an animal has moved in an environment. One class of model of path integration uses a continuous attractor network to update position information. The first part of this thesis showed that such a network can generate a "look-ahead" of neural activity that sweeps through the positions just visited and about to be visited, on the short time scale that is observed<italic>in vivo</italic>. Adding intrinsic currents to the neurons in the network model allowed this look-ahead to recur every theta cycle, and generate grid fields of a size comparable to data. Grid cells are a major input the hippocampus, and are hypothesized to be the source of the place specificity of place cells. When an animal explores an open environment, place cells are active in a particular location regardless of the direction in which the animal travels through it. While performing a specific task, such as visiting specific locations in the environment in sequence, however, most place cells are active only in one direction. The second part of this thesis studied the development of this directionality. It was determined that upon the initial appearance of place fields in a novel environment, place cells fired in all directions, supporting the hypothesis that the path integration is the primary determinant of place specificity. The directionality of place fields developed gradually, possibly as a result of learning. Ideas about how this directionality could develop are explored.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
path integration; spatial navigation; Neuroscience; hippocampus; medial entorhinal cortex
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Neuroscience
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McNaughton, Bruce L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Path Integration on Neural Activity in Hippocampus and Medial Entorhinal Cortexen_US
dc.creatorNavratilova, Zanetaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNavratilova, Zanetaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the role of path integration on the firing of hippocampal place cells and medial entorhinal grid cells. Grid cells fire at equidistant locations in an environment, indicating that they keep track of the distance and direction an animal has moved in an environment. One class of model of path integration uses a continuous attractor network to update position information. The first part of this thesis showed that such a network can generate a "look-ahead" of neural activity that sweeps through the positions just visited and about to be visited, on the short time scale that is observed<italic>in vivo</italic>. Adding intrinsic currents to the neurons in the network model allowed this look-ahead to recur every theta cycle, and generate grid fields of a size comparable to data. Grid cells are a major input the hippocampus, and are hypothesized to be the source of the place specificity of place cells. When an animal explores an open environment, place cells are active in a particular location regardless of the direction in which the animal travels through it. While performing a specific task, such as visiting specific locations in the environment in sequence, however, most place cells are active only in one direction. The second part of this thesis studied the development of this directionality. It was determined that upon the initial appearance of place fields in a novel environment, place cells fired in all directions, supporting the hypothesis that the path integration is the primary determinant of place specificity. The directionality of place fields developed gradually, possibly as a result of learning. Ideas about how this directionality could develop are explored.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectpath integrationen_US
dc.subjectspatial navigationen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjecthippocampusen_US
dc.subjectmedial entorhinal cortexen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcNaughton, Bruce L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGothard, Katalinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuglevand, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZinsmaier, Konraden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcNaughton, Bruce L.en_US
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