The Maze Task: Using a Computerized Psycholinguistic Experimental Technique in Examining Methodologies for Second Language Learning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238674
Title:
The Maze Task: Using a Computerized Psycholinguistic Experimental Technique in Examining Methodologies for Second Language Learning
Author:
Enkin, Elizabeth Bella
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 19-Jun-2014
Abstract:
The maze task is a psycholinguistic tool that is used in experimentally measuring online sentence processing time (Forster et al., 2009). It asks subjects to "weave" their way through sentences, choosing the correct grammatical alternative from two choices. This task can also offer insight into the processing strategies of L2 learners. Thus, whether or not this task can be used as an effective training program for beginning L2 learners is the topic of this current investigation. The maze task is therefore transformed into the "story maze", which contextualizes sentences for learners. Because the task provides immediate feedback regarding the precise location of an error, learners can efficiently tune their L2 processing strategies, which echoes VanPatten (2004) and his objective with processing instruction. In effect, connections made in the classroom through explicit instruction can be reinforced and strengthened through implicit maze task training. Using L2 Spanish learners, the efficacy of training types is tested in order to investigate whether the maze task can assist learners in altering their processing strategies of complex, L2 structures that are not found in the L1. Furthermore, the task's generalizing capability with respect to building the implicit and explicit knowledge bases is examined. Lastly, because the task speaks to students' identity as learners in a technologically advanced world, the likability of this task is evaluated through qualitative data, and pedagogical implications are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Psycholinguistics; Second Language Acquisition; Second Language Learning; Spanish Learning; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Applied Linguistics; Foreign Language Learning
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Forster, Kenneth I.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Maze Task: Using a Computerized Psycholinguistic Experimental Technique in Examining Methodologies for Second Language Learningen_US
dc.creatorEnkin, Elizabeth Bellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEnkin, Elizabeth Bellaen_US
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 19-Jun-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThe maze task is a psycholinguistic tool that is used in experimentally measuring online sentence processing time (Forster et al., 2009). It asks subjects to "weave" their way through sentences, choosing the correct grammatical alternative from two choices. This task can also offer insight into the processing strategies of L2 learners. Thus, whether or not this task can be used as an effective training program for beginning L2 learners is the topic of this current investigation. The maze task is therefore transformed into the "story maze", which contextualizes sentences for learners. Because the task provides immediate feedback regarding the precise location of an error, learners can efficiently tune their L2 processing strategies, which echoes VanPatten (2004) and his objective with processing instruction. In effect, connections made in the classroom through explicit instruction can be reinforced and strengthened through implicit maze task training. Using L2 Spanish learners, the efficacy of training types is tested in order to investigate whether the maze task can assist learners in altering their processing strategies of complex, L2 structures that are not found in the L1. Furthermore, the task's generalizing capability with respect to building the implicit and explicit knowledge bases is examined. Lastly, because the task speaks to students' identity as learners in a technologically advanced world, the likability of this task is evaluated through qualitative data, and pedagogical implications are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPsycholinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisitionen_US
dc.subjectSecond Language Learningen_US
dc.subjectSpanish Learningen_US
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
dc.subjectApplied Linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectForeign Language Learningen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNicol, Janet L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAriew, Robert A.en_US
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