Engagement with Novel Internet Technologies: The Role of Perceived Novelty in the Development of the Deficient Self-Regulation of Internet use and Media Habits

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238658
Title:
Engagement with Novel Internet Technologies: The Role of Perceived Novelty in the Development of the Deficient Self-Regulation of Internet use and Media Habits
Author:
Tokunaga, Robert Shota
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation attempts to expand our understanding of the deficient self-regulation (DSR) of Internet use and media habit development. Drawing from a social cognitive perspective, DSR is described as lapses in effective self-control that are self-corrected over time. A shortcoming in this area of research is that factors relevant to the technology that may encourage the development of DSR or media habits are rarely, if ever, discussed. A large focus of existing research is instead narrowly placed on individual factors that motivate DSR and media habits. An extension is proposed to theory on DSR in this dissertation by examining the role played by novelty perceptions of technology. In the initial stages of technology use, when perceptions of novelty generally grow, perceived novelty is hypothesized to elicit a state of flow, which in turn diminishes the subfunctions of self-regulation and provokes DSR. The relationship between perceived novelty and flow is moderated by psychosocial problems, boredom proneness, and self-reactive outcome expectation. As perceived novelty of a technology decreases, it is presumed that self-control is restored given that flow no longer inhibits self-regulation. However, DSR and media habits are hypothesized to persist in later technology use if individuals experience psychosocial problems, boredom proneness, or high self-reactive outcome expectations. The manifestation of DSR in later stages of technology use increases the likelihood of forming media habits. The influence of novelty perceptions was evaluated on flow, DSR, and media habits at initial and later stages of technology use. The pretest demonstrated that a novelty frame successfully manipulated novelty perceptions of Second Life, the technology used in this experiment, in anticipated directions. In the main study, perceived novelty resulted in flow, which in turn predicted growth of DSR during initial stages of Second Life use. In the familiar stages of use, DSR led to the development of media habits over time; however, the relationship between novelty perceptions and DSR was not moderated by psychosocial problems, boredom proneness, or self-reactive outcome expectation. The findings of this investigation are discussed aside their implications for research, theory, and practice.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Latent Growth Modeling; Perceived Novelty; Problematic Internet Use; Social Cognitive Theory; Communication; Deficient Self-Regulation; Internet Addiction
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rains, Stephen A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEngagement with Novel Internet Technologies: The Role of Perceived Novelty in the Development of the Deficient Self-Regulation of Internet use and Media Habitsen_US
dc.creatorTokunaga, Robert Shotaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTokunaga, Robert Shotaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation attempts to expand our understanding of the deficient self-regulation (DSR) of Internet use and media habit development. Drawing from a social cognitive perspective, DSR is described as lapses in effective self-control that are self-corrected over time. A shortcoming in this area of research is that factors relevant to the technology that may encourage the development of DSR or media habits are rarely, if ever, discussed. A large focus of existing research is instead narrowly placed on individual factors that motivate DSR and media habits. An extension is proposed to theory on DSR in this dissertation by examining the role played by novelty perceptions of technology. In the initial stages of technology use, when perceptions of novelty generally grow, perceived novelty is hypothesized to elicit a state of flow, which in turn diminishes the subfunctions of self-regulation and provokes DSR. The relationship between perceived novelty and flow is moderated by psychosocial problems, boredom proneness, and self-reactive outcome expectation. As perceived novelty of a technology decreases, it is presumed that self-control is restored given that flow no longer inhibits self-regulation. However, DSR and media habits are hypothesized to persist in later technology use if individuals experience psychosocial problems, boredom proneness, or high self-reactive outcome expectations. The manifestation of DSR in later stages of technology use increases the likelihood of forming media habits. The influence of novelty perceptions was evaluated on flow, DSR, and media habits at initial and later stages of technology use. The pretest demonstrated that a novelty frame successfully manipulated novelty perceptions of Second Life, the technology used in this experiment, in anticipated directions. In the main study, perceived novelty resulted in flow, which in turn predicted growth of DSR during initial stages of Second Life use. In the familiar stages of use, DSR led to the development of media habits over time; however, the relationship between novelty perceptions and DSR was not moderated by psychosocial problems, boredom proneness, or self-reactive outcome expectation. The findings of this investigation are discussed aside their implications for research, theory, and practice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLatent Growth Modelingen_US
dc.subjectPerceived Noveltyen_US
dc.subjectProblematic Internet Useen_US
dc.subjectSocial Cognitive Theoryen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectDeficient Self-Regulationen_US
dc.subjectInternet Addictionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRains, Stephen A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKunkel, Daleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRains, Stephen A.en_US
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