The Impact of Similarity on Influence Attempts during Group Discussions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238656
Title:
The Impact of Similarity on Influence Attempts during Group Discussions
Author:
Ervin, Jennifer
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two studies were conducted in order to investigate the role of similarity and influence processes in groups. It was proposed that if group members believe they share one or more salient characteristics (i.e., relevant to the evaluation process) with a target it will (a) fundamentally change the way those group members orient themselves towards that target, and (b) subsequently affect the way those members contribute to the group discussion. Findings suggested that group members who were similar to a target were perceived as having contributed more novel arguments to the group discussion than those dissimilar, and high self-reported levels of communication competence significantly predicted a person's ability to generate arguments about a target. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
similarity; Small group; Communication; decision-making; influence
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bonito, Joseph A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Similarity on Influence Attempts during Group Discussionsen_US
dc.creatorErvin, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorErvin, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo studies were conducted in order to investigate the role of similarity and influence processes in groups. It was proposed that if group members believe they share one or more salient characteristics (i.e., relevant to the evaluation process) with a target it will (a) fundamentally change the way those group members orient themselves towards that target, and (b) subsequently affect the way those members contribute to the group discussion. Findings suggested that group members who were similar to a target were perceived as having contributed more novel arguments to the group discussion than those dissimilar, and high self-reported levels of communication competence significantly predicted a person's ability to generate arguments about a target. Limitations and future directions are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectsimilarityen_US
dc.subjectSmall groupen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectdecision-makingen_US
dc.subjectinfluenceen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBonito, Joseph A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jakeen_US
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