Using PROC GLIMMIX to Analyze the Animal Watch, a Web-Based Tutoring System for Algebra Readiness

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238636
Title:
Using PROC GLIMMIX to Analyze the Animal Watch, a Web-Based Tutoring System for Algebra Readiness
Author:
Barbu, Otilia C.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, I investigated how proficiently seventh-grade students enrolled in two Southwestern schools solve algebra word problems. I analyzed various factors that could affect this proficiency and explored the differences between English Learners (ELs) and native English Primary students (EPs). I collected the data as part of the Animal Watch project, a computer-based initiative designed to improve the mathematical skills of children from grades 5-8 in the Southwest. A sample of 86 students (26 ELs and 60 EPs), clustered in four different classes, was used for this project. A Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) approach with the GLIMMIX procedure in SAS 9.3 showed that students from the classes that had a higher percentage of EL students performed better than those in the classes where the EL concentration was lower. Classes with more EL males were better at learning mathematics than classes with more EP females. The results also indicated: (a) a positive correlation between the students' ability to solve algebra word problems on their first attempt and their success ratio in solving all problems, and (b) a negative correlation between the percentage of problems solved correctly and those considered too hard from the very beginning. I conclude my dissertation by making specific recommendations for further research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
English Primary students; Generalized Linear Mixed Model; GLIMMIX; mathematical skills; Educational Psychology; Animal Watch; English Learners
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Levine-Donnerstein, Deborah

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleUsing PROC GLIMMIX to Analyze the Animal Watch, a Web-Based Tutoring System for Algebra Readinessen_US
dc.creatorBarbu, Otilia C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarbu, Otilia C.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, I investigated how proficiently seventh-grade students enrolled in two Southwestern schools solve algebra word problems. I analyzed various factors that could affect this proficiency and explored the differences between English Learners (ELs) and native English Primary students (EPs). I collected the data as part of the Animal Watch project, a computer-based initiative designed to improve the mathematical skills of children from grades 5-8 in the Southwest. A sample of 86 students (26 ELs and 60 EPs), clustered in four different classes, was used for this project. A Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) approach with the GLIMMIX procedure in SAS 9.3 showed that students from the classes that had a higher percentage of EL students performed better than those in the classes where the EL concentration was lower. Classes with more EL males were better at learning mathematics than classes with more EP females. The results also indicated: (a) a positive correlation between the students' ability to solve algebra word problems on their first attempt and their success ratio in solving all problems, and (b) a negative correlation between the percentage of problems solved correctly and those considered too hard from the very beginning. I conclude my dissertation by making specific recommendations for further research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEnglish Primary studentsen_US
dc.subjectGeneralized Linear Mixed Modelen_US
dc.subjectGLIMMIXen_US
dc.subjectmathematical skillsen_US
dc.subjectEducational Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectAnimal Watchen_US
dc.subjectEnglish Learnersen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLevine-Donnerstein, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarx, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGood, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGraw, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine-Donnerstein, Deborahen_US
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