Persuasive Embodied Agents: Using Embodied Agents to Change People's Behavior, Beliefs, and Assessments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/238634
Title:
Persuasive Embodied Agents: Using Embodied Agents to Change People's Behavior, Beliefs, and Assessments
Author:
Pickard, Matthew
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Embodied Conversational Agents (i.e., avatars; ECAs) are appearing in increasingly many everyday contexts, such as e-commerce, occupational training, and airport security. Also common to a typical person's daily life is persuasion. Whether being persuaded or persuading, the ability to change another person's attitude or behavior is a thoroughly researched topic. However, little is known about ECAs' ability to persuade and whether basic persuasion principles from human-human interactions will hold in human-ECA interactions. This work investigates this question. First, a broad review of persuasion literature, which serves as an inventory of manipulations to test in ECA contexts, is presented. This literature review serves an inventory to guide future Persuasive ECA work. The ECA literature is then reviewed. Two preliminary studies exploring the effects of physical attractiveness, voice quality, argument quality, common ground, authority, and facial similarity are presented. Finally, the culminating study testing the effectiveness of ECAs to elicit self-disclosure in automated interviewing is presented and discussed. The findings of that automated interviewing study suggest that ECAs may replace humans in automated interviewing contexts. The findings also suggest that ECAs that are manipulated to look like their interviewees are able to induce greater likeability, establish more rapport, and elicited more self-referencing language than ECAs that do not look like the interviewees.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
embodied agent; embodied conversational agent; persuasion; self-disclosure; Management Information Systems; automated interviewing; avatar
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management Information Systems
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F., Jr.; Burgoon, Judee K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePersuasive Embodied Agents: Using Embodied Agents to Change People's Behavior, Beliefs, and Assessmentsen_US
dc.creatorPickard, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorPickard, Matthewen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmbodied Conversational Agents (i.e., avatars; ECAs) are appearing in increasingly many everyday contexts, such as e-commerce, occupational training, and airport security. Also common to a typical person's daily life is persuasion. Whether being persuaded or persuading, the ability to change another person's attitude or behavior is a thoroughly researched topic. However, little is known about ECAs' ability to persuade and whether basic persuasion principles from human-human interactions will hold in human-ECA interactions. This work investigates this question. First, a broad review of persuasion literature, which serves as an inventory of manipulations to test in ECA contexts, is presented. This literature review serves an inventory to guide future Persuasive ECA work. The ECA literature is then reviewed. Two preliminary studies exploring the effects of physical attractiveness, voice quality, argument quality, common ground, authority, and facial similarity are presented. Finally, the culminating study testing the effectiveness of ECAs to elicit self-disclosure in automated interviewing is presented and discussed. The findings of that automated interviewing study suggest that ECAs may replace humans in automated interviewing contexts. The findings also suggest that ECAs that are manipulated to look like their interviewees are able to induce greater likeability, establish more rapport, and elicited more self-referencing language than ECAs that do not look like the interviewees.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectembodied agenten_US
dc.subjectembodied conversational agenten_US
dc.subjectpersuasionen_US
dc.subjectself-disclosureen_US
dc.subjectManagement Information Systemsen_US
dc.subjectautomated interviewingen_US
dc.subjectavataren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberValacich, Joseph S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNunamaker, Jay F., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
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