Social and Cognitive Factors Associated with HIV/AIDS Test Uptake in Kenya

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/232495
Title:
Social and Cognitive Factors Associated with HIV/AIDS Test Uptake in Kenya
Author:
Mugoya, George Charles Tongi
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 25-Jun-2013
Abstract:
The Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) continues to have enormous implications on the health, economic and psychosocial well-being of individuals, family structures, and communities. Sub-Saharan Africa is the region most affected by the HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this study is to investigate the social and cognitive factors associated with HIV test uptake in the general population of Kenya. Data from the 2009/2010 Kenya Demographic Health Survey were utilized. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using STATA/SE software. Results showed that there were statistically significant differences between men and women in previous HIV testing status and HIV test uptake. Over 90% of participants reported knowing a place to seek testing. The mean HIV related knowledge was higher in men than women (x =0.1; 95% CI 0.04-0.16) than women (x = 0.04; 95% CI [0.01- 0.1]). Differences were found in expressed HIV stigmatizing attitudes, with women reporting more stigmatizing attitudes than men. For example 9.9% of women compared to 4.7% of men reported very high HIV stigmatizing attitudes. Weighted multinomial regression analyses were conducted with individuals who had not been previously tested and unwilling to be tested utilized as the reference group. Among the factors found to be significantly associated with HIV uptake include: HIV related knowledge- higher levels of HIV related knowledge were associated with increased HIV test uptake for men and women, HIV related stigma- lower levels of HIV related stigma were significantly associated with HIV test uptake for women but not men, acceptance to teach condoms to children and knowledge of someone infected with HIV/AIDS was positively associated with HIV test uptake, gender- compared to men, women were significantly less likely to agree to be take the HIV/AIDS test if not previously tested (OR 0.79; 95% CI [0.64, 0.97]) but significantly more likely to accept the HIV/AIDS test when offered (OR 1.341; 95% CI [1.02, 1.76]). Other significant associations included: Age, education attainment, sex of head of household, and wanting to keep a family member's tuberculosis infection a secret.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Kenya; Social and Cognitive Factors; Sub-saharan Africa; Special Education & Rehabilitation; HIV/AIDS; HIV test Uptake
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education & Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sales, Amos

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSocial and Cognitive Factors Associated with HIV/AIDS Test Uptake in Kenyaen_US
dc.creatorMugoya, George Charles Tongien_US
dc.contributor.authorMugoya, George Charles Tongien_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 25-Jun-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) continues to have enormous implications on the health, economic and psychosocial well-being of individuals, family structures, and communities. Sub-Saharan Africa is the region most affected by the HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this study is to investigate the social and cognitive factors associated with HIV test uptake in the general population of Kenya. Data from the 2009/2010 Kenya Demographic Health Survey were utilized. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using STATA/SE software. Results showed that there were statistically significant differences between men and women in previous HIV testing status and HIV test uptake. Over 90% of participants reported knowing a place to seek testing. The mean HIV related knowledge was higher in men than women (x =0.1; 95% CI 0.04-0.16) than women (x = 0.04; 95% CI [0.01- 0.1]). Differences were found in expressed HIV stigmatizing attitudes, with women reporting more stigmatizing attitudes than men. For example 9.9% of women compared to 4.7% of men reported very high HIV stigmatizing attitudes. Weighted multinomial regression analyses were conducted with individuals who had not been previously tested and unwilling to be tested utilized as the reference group. Among the factors found to be significantly associated with HIV uptake include: HIV related knowledge- higher levels of HIV related knowledge were associated with increased HIV test uptake for men and women, HIV related stigma- lower levels of HIV related stigma were significantly associated with HIV test uptake for women but not men, acceptance to teach condoms to children and knowledge of someone infected with HIV/AIDS was positively associated with HIV test uptake, gender- compared to men, women were significantly less likely to agree to be take the HIV/AIDS test if not previously tested (OR 0.79; 95% CI [0.64, 0.97]) but significantly more likely to accept the HIV/AIDS test when offered (OR 1.341; 95% CI [1.02, 1.76]). Other significant associations included: Age, education attainment, sex of head of household, and wanting to keep a family member's tuberculosis infection a secret.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectSocial and Cognitive Factorsen_US
dc.subjectSub-saharan Africaen_US
dc.subjectSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.subjectHIV test Uptakeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKampfe, Charleneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChou, Chih-Chinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberErnst, Kaceyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
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