Understanding the Relationship Between Tobacco Use, Sleep Quality and Self-Efficacy in Adults with PTSD

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/229775
Title:
Understanding the Relationship Between Tobacco Use, Sleep Quality and Self-Efficacy in Adults with PTSD
Author:
LeBlanc, Timothy P.
Issue Date:
May-2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Adults with PTSD are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco as compared to the general population in the United States. Measures to be administered to 11 participants are the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, General Self-Efficacy Scale, a daily sleep diary, and a substance use log. There were no significant differences between adult tobacco users and non-tobacco users, as it relates to sleep quality and generalized self-efficacy. The small sample size and low number of tobacco users (n = 4) seriously limit the power to detect differences, as well as the stability of results. Our analyses show there are significant relationships between GSE and nightmare frequency, PCL and nightmare frequency, and PCL and sleep quality regardless of tobacco use. These findings suggest that traumatized people with PTSD exhibit a lower level of perceived self-efficacy than do traumatized people without PTSD. As nightmares are one of several accompanying symptoms of PTSD, this could account for participants with higher GSE scores experiencing lower nightmare frequency. As expected, participants with higher PCL scores experienced more nightmares and worse sleep quality.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding the Relationship Between Tobacco Use, Sleep Quality and Self-Efficacy in Adults with PTSDen_US
dc.creatorLeBlanc, Timothy P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeBlanc, Timothy P.en_US
dc.date.issued2011-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdults with PTSD are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco as compared to the general population in the United States. Measures to be administered to 11 participants are the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, General Self-Efficacy Scale, a daily sleep diary, and a substance use log. There were no significant differences between adult tobacco users and non-tobacco users, as it relates to sleep quality and generalized self-efficacy. The small sample size and low number of tobacco users (n = 4) seriously limit the power to detect differences, as well as the stability of results. Our analyses show there are significant relationships between GSE and nightmare frequency, PCL and nightmare frequency, and PCL and sleep quality regardless of tobacco use. These findings suggest that traumatized people with PTSD exhibit a lower level of perceived self-efficacy than do traumatized people without PTSD. As nightmares are one of several accompanying symptoms of PTSD, this could account for participants with higher GSE scores experiencing lower nightmare frequency. As expected, participants with higher PCL scores experienced more nightmares and worse sleep quality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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