Embracing Fracture: The Buddhist Poetics of Allen Ginsberg and Norman Fischer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228611
Title:
Embracing Fracture: The Buddhist Poetics of Allen Ginsberg and Norman Fischer
Author:
Rotando, Matthew Louis
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is an exploration of the strain of Buddhist thought and practice running through American Modernism and American Modernist Poetry. I examine the works, both poetic and critical, of two authors, Allen Ginsberg and Norman Fischer. I explore Allen Ginsberg's relationship with Buddhism, as it changed throughout his life, looking at key poems in his early career, such as "Sakyamuni Coming Out of the Mountain," and "The Change: Kyoto to Tokyo Express." I also examine "Howl" in light of Ginsberg's early experiences with Buddhism and other spiritual forms. I consider some of the poetics and politics of "Howl" as an example of the both the poetic space and the mind Ginsberg prepared for his later spiritual and poetic life. I also theorize the connections between the Buddhist attitude that Ginsberg cultivates and the modernism of Ezra Pound, who eschewed Buddhist ideas and terms in his re-working of Ernest Fenollosa's well-known essay, "The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry." I examine the way Ginsberg considered Pound's Cantos as a model of a mind, in the act of the real work of thinking. I end my treatment of Ginsberg's work with a reading of "Father Death Blues" which Ginsberg considered the "culmination" of his Buddhist training. Looking at Norman Fischer, I focus closely on the Zen aspects of his writing, spending special attention on notions of the koan, as well as things he says (in his Zen lectures and elsewhere) about intersections between Zen mind perception models and models of mind that come via the practices of psychoanalysis. I work to explain how Fischer situates in terms of the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets and other avant-garde poetic movements. I explore how Fischer's innovative style(s) work within his poetic practices in "Praise," an extended journal/diary poem from Precisely The Point Being Made and the Cage/MacLow practices of releasing of ego and agency in writing methods. I also look at how such journal/diary poems compare to other poetic "mind models" within American Modernism. My chapters on Fischer culminate in a discussion, with significant close readings, of his book Success.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Buddhist Poetry; Buddhist Studies; Contemporary Poetics; Norman Fischer; English; Allen Ginsberg; Buddhist Poetics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nathanson, Tenney

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEmbracing Fracture: The Buddhist Poetics of Allen Ginsberg and Norman Fischeren_US
dc.creatorRotando, Matthew Louisen_US
dc.contributor.authorRotando, Matthew Louisen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an exploration of the strain of Buddhist thought and practice running through American Modernism and American Modernist Poetry. I examine the works, both poetic and critical, of two authors, Allen Ginsberg and Norman Fischer. I explore Allen Ginsberg's relationship with Buddhism, as it changed throughout his life, looking at key poems in his early career, such as "Sakyamuni Coming Out of the Mountain," and "The Change: Kyoto to Tokyo Express." I also examine "Howl" in light of Ginsberg's early experiences with Buddhism and other spiritual forms. I consider some of the poetics and politics of "Howl" as an example of the both the poetic space and the mind Ginsberg prepared for his later spiritual and poetic life. I also theorize the connections between the Buddhist attitude that Ginsberg cultivates and the modernism of Ezra Pound, who eschewed Buddhist ideas and terms in his re-working of Ernest Fenollosa's well-known essay, "The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry." I examine the way Ginsberg considered Pound's Cantos as a model of a mind, in the act of the real work of thinking. I end my treatment of Ginsberg's work with a reading of "Father Death Blues" which Ginsberg considered the "culmination" of his Buddhist training. Looking at Norman Fischer, I focus closely on the Zen aspects of his writing, spending special attention on notions of the koan, as well as things he says (in his Zen lectures and elsewhere) about intersections between Zen mind perception models and models of mind that come via the practices of psychoanalysis. I work to explain how Fischer situates in terms of the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets and other avant-garde poetic movements. I explore how Fischer's innovative style(s) work within his poetic practices in "Praise," an extended journal/diary poem from Precisely The Point Being Made and the Cage/MacLow practices of releasing of ego and agency in writing methods. I also look at how such journal/diary poems compare to other poetic "mind models" within American Modernism. My chapters on Fischer culminate in a discussion, with significant close readings, of his book Success.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBuddhist Poetryen_US
dc.subjectBuddhist Studiesen_US
dc.subjectContemporary Poeticsen_US
dc.subjectNorman Fischeren_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectAllen Ginsbergen_US
dc.subjectBuddhist Poeticsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNathanson, Tenneyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRaval, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGallego, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNathanson, Tenneyen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.