Effect of Residence Time on Microbial and Chemical Quality of Reclaimed Water In Urban Infrastructures

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228512
Title:
Effect of Residence Time on Microbial and Chemical Quality of Reclaimed Water In Urban Infrastructures
Author:
Ajibode, Oluyomi Marriet
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 25-Apr-2013
Abstract:
The goal of this study was to assess the effect of residence time on the chemical and microbial quality of reclaimed water in two distribution systems located in southern Arizona. Utility A produced Class A water and utilized chlorine as a means of disinfection whereas Utility B produced Class A+ water and utilized UV radiation as a means of disinfection. Water-based pathogens were consistently detected in both distribution systems beyond the point of compliance, while microbial indicators like Escherichia coli was only detected in Utility B suggesting that treatment eliminated waterborne pathogens. Heterotrophic plate concentrations in samples from both utilities initially increased rapidly with increased distance from the point-of-compliance and were as high as 10⁹ CFU/100ml. Regardless of the initial level of treatment, the microbial quality deteriorated with increased residence time in the distribution systems. The second study was designed to evaluate the effect of reclaimed water storage on microbial and chemical quality of two classes of reclaimed water (Class A and Class A+). In Class A water, nitrification was observed during both field scale trials resulting in concentrations greater than 10mg/L while nitrification was not observed in Class A+. Chlorine residuals rapidly decreased within 48hours of storage. HPC concentration were as high as 10⁷ - 10⁸ /100ml. In both field scale trials, there was no observed growth of HPC during storage and waterborne indicator bacteria were rarely detected, and if detected, only at low concentrations. Based on this data, deterioration of microbial water quality during storage is minimal.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Water-based pathogens; Waterborne pathogens; Microbiology; Reclaimed water; Residence time
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pepper, Ian L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of Residence Time on Microbial and Chemical Quality of Reclaimed Water In Urban Infrastructuresen_US
dc.creatorAjibode, Oluyomi Marrieten_US
dc.contributor.authorAjibode, Oluyomi Marrieten_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 25-Apr-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this study was to assess the effect of residence time on the chemical and microbial quality of reclaimed water in two distribution systems located in southern Arizona. Utility A produced Class A water and utilized chlorine as a means of disinfection whereas Utility B produced Class A+ water and utilized UV radiation as a means of disinfection. Water-based pathogens were consistently detected in both distribution systems beyond the point of compliance, while microbial indicators like Escherichia coli was only detected in Utility B suggesting that treatment eliminated waterborne pathogens. Heterotrophic plate concentrations in samples from both utilities initially increased rapidly with increased distance from the point-of-compliance and were as high as 10⁹ CFU/100ml. Regardless of the initial level of treatment, the microbial quality deteriorated with increased residence time in the distribution systems. The second study was designed to evaluate the effect of reclaimed water storage on microbial and chemical quality of two classes of reclaimed water (Class A and Class A+). In Class A water, nitrification was observed during both field scale trials resulting in concentrations greater than 10mg/L while nitrification was not observed in Class A+. Chlorine residuals rapidly decreased within 48hours of storage. HPC concentration were as high as 10⁷ - 10⁸ /100ml. In both field scale trials, there was no observed growth of HPC during storage and waterborne indicator bacteria were rarely detected, and if detected, only at low concentrations. Based on this data, deterioration of microbial water quality during storage is minimal.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectWater-based pathogensen_US
dc.subjectWaterborne pathogensen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectReclaimed wateren_US
dc.subjectResidence timeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRock, Channahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBright, Kelly R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReynold, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
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