Generating and Manipulating Quantized Vortices in Highly Oblate Bose-Einstein Condensates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228499
Title:
Generating and Manipulating Quantized Vortices in Highly Oblate Bose-Einstein Condensates
Author:
Samson, Edward Carlo Copon
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 30-Oct-2012
Abstract:
This dissertation presents several experimental methods that were devised to generate or manipulate quantized vortices in highly oblate dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Studies that involve single vortex dynamics, vortex-vortex interactions, and vortex-impurity interactions are essential in developing a deeper understanding of the nature of superfluidity and in particular, superfluid turbulence. In highly oblate systems, vortex dynamics have a two-dimensional (2D) nature and the resulting superfluid characteristics may be substantially different from those in three-dimensional (3D) superfluids. However, there have been remarkably few experimental studies of 2D vortex dynamics in superfluids. Therefore, to study 2D vortex dynamics and interactions, it is necessary to first develop experimental methods that can generate vortices and vortex distributions in nominally 2D systems, such as highly oblate BECs. Four main experiments are discussed in this dissertation. Two of these experiments generate multiple singly quantized vortices in a relatively stochastic manner leading to disordered vortex distributions. From these two vortex methods, the physics of high vorticity and highly disordered systems may be observed and studied in a highly oblate system. These methods may prove useful in studies of 2D quantum turbulence. The other two experiments involve newly developed techniques for controlled generation and manipulation of vortices. One of these methods creates multiply quantized pinned vortices with a control in the generated vorticity. The other method reliably creates a pair of singly quantized vortices of opposite circulation, whose positions can be easily manipulated after creation, such that they can be placed in any location within the BEC. The two techniques may be scalable to higher number of vortices and may prove useful in superfluid dynamics and vortex interactions that require repeatable vortex distributions. Taken together, these tools and methods may be applicable to many further studies of vortex physics in highly oblate BECs.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
highly oblate geometry; quantum turbulence; quantum vortex; superfluid; Optical Sciences; 2D physics; Bose-Einstein condensate
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Anderson, Brian P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGenerating and Manipulating Quantized Vortices in Highly Oblate Bose-Einstein Condensatesen_US
dc.creatorSamson, Edward Carlo Coponen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamson, Edward Carlo Coponen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 30-Oct-2012en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents several experimental methods that were devised to generate or manipulate quantized vortices in highly oblate dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Studies that involve single vortex dynamics, vortex-vortex interactions, and vortex-impurity interactions are essential in developing a deeper understanding of the nature of superfluidity and in particular, superfluid turbulence. In highly oblate systems, vortex dynamics have a two-dimensional (2D) nature and the resulting superfluid characteristics may be substantially different from those in three-dimensional (3D) superfluids. However, there have been remarkably few experimental studies of 2D vortex dynamics in superfluids. Therefore, to study 2D vortex dynamics and interactions, it is necessary to first develop experimental methods that can generate vortices and vortex distributions in nominally 2D systems, such as highly oblate BECs. Four main experiments are discussed in this dissertation. Two of these experiments generate multiple singly quantized vortices in a relatively stochastic manner leading to disordered vortex distributions. From these two vortex methods, the physics of high vorticity and highly disordered systems may be observed and studied in a highly oblate system. These methods may prove useful in studies of 2D quantum turbulence. The other two experiments involve newly developed techniques for controlled generation and manipulation of vortices. One of these methods creates multiply quantized pinned vortices with a control in the generated vorticity. The other method reliably creates a pair of singly quantized vortices of opposite circulation, whose positions can be easily manipulated after creation, such that they can be placed in any location within the BEC. The two techniques may be scalable to higher number of vortices and may prove useful in superfluid dynamics and vortex interactions that require repeatable vortex distributions. Taken together, these tools and methods may be applicable to many further studies of vortex physics in highly oblate BECs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthighly oblate geometryen_US
dc.subjectquantum turbulenceen_US
dc.subjectquantum vortexen_US
dc.subjectsuperfluiden_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject2D physicsen_US
dc.subjectBose-Einstein condensateen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Brian P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJessen, Poul S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRight, Ewan M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Brian P.en_US
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