Compound Risk: An Analysis of Biocultural, Familial, and Structural Risks Among Substance Using Adolescent Girls

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228478
Title:
Compound Risk: An Analysis of Biocultural, Familial, and Structural Risks Among Substance Using Adolescent Girls
Author:
Hedges, Kristin Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Adolescent substance abuse represents a complex, difficult challenge in the United States. Substance addiction research requires rich contextualization that takes into account individual, familial, and community experiences. This project focuses on how adolescent girls' substance use interacts with risk and vulnerability. More specifically, how the social and biological body influences substance initiation and how local contexts and constraints effects recovery from addiction. The sample includes adolescent girls who are enrolled in substance abuse treatment programs. The methodological approach encompasses a mixture of quantitative and qualitative, including analysis of a nation-wide dataset, narrative interviews, participant observation, and case following. While the quantitative analysis was with the nation-wide dataset, the qualitative data are derived from a sample of adolescent girls in Tucson, Arizona. Risk is assessed along three axes, biocultural, familial, and structural. Biocultural risk examines the influence that an early pubertal developmental trajectory has on substance initiation. Familial risk analyzes how the culture and habitus of the family affects youth initiation of substance use. Structural risk highlights the continued vulnerability that youth who are raised in the `system' face and specifically their challenges to recovery after substance abuse treatment. Findings from the nation-wide sample include a significant relationship between pubertal timing and age of onset of substance use. In the Tucson sample, familial immersion in substance use was so extensive that girls were not only expected to begin using but also initiation of use became a 'rite of passage' within the family. Finally this research documents the unintended role the child welfare system plays as a structural impediment to girls' recovery from substance abuse.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Puberty; Risk and Vulnerability; Structural Violence; Substance Abuse; Anthropology; Adolescent Females; Familial Addiction
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pike, Ivy L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCompound Risk: An Analysis of Biocultural, Familial, and Structural Risks Among Substance Using Adolescent Girlsen_US
dc.creatorHedges, Kristin Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedges, Kristin Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdolescent substance abuse represents a complex, difficult challenge in the United States. Substance addiction research requires rich contextualization that takes into account individual, familial, and community experiences. This project focuses on how adolescent girls' substance use interacts with risk and vulnerability. More specifically, how the social and biological body influences substance initiation and how local contexts and constraints effects recovery from addiction. The sample includes adolescent girls who are enrolled in substance abuse treatment programs. The methodological approach encompasses a mixture of quantitative and qualitative, including analysis of a nation-wide dataset, narrative interviews, participant observation, and case following. While the quantitative analysis was with the nation-wide dataset, the qualitative data are derived from a sample of adolescent girls in Tucson, Arizona. Risk is assessed along three axes, biocultural, familial, and structural. Biocultural risk examines the influence that an early pubertal developmental trajectory has on substance initiation. Familial risk analyzes how the culture and habitus of the family affects youth initiation of substance use. Structural risk highlights the continued vulnerability that youth who are raised in the `system' face and specifically their challenges to recovery after substance abuse treatment. Findings from the nation-wide sample include a significant relationship between pubertal timing and age of onset of substance use. In the Tucson sample, familial immersion in substance use was so extensive that girls were not only expected to begin using but also initiation of use became a 'rite of passage' within the family. Finally this research documents the unintended role the child welfare system plays as a structural impediment to girls' recovery from substance abuse.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPubertyen_US
dc.subjectRisk and Vulnerabilityen_US
dc.subjectStructural Violenceen_US
dc.subjectSubstance Abuseen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectAdolescent Femalesen_US
dc.subjectFamilial Addictionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPike, Ivy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPike, Ivy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStevens, Sally J.en_US
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