Aesthetics of Destruction: Music and the Worldview of Ikari Shinji in Neon Genesis Evangelion

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228474
Title:
Aesthetics of Destruction: Music and the Worldview of Ikari Shinji in Neon Genesis Evangelion
Author:
Hoffer, Heike
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Thesis not available (per author's request)
Abstract:
Director Anno Hideaki's series Neon Genesis Evangelion caused a sensation when it first aired on TV Tokyo in 1995 and has become one of the most influential anime ever made. Since its premiere, fans across the globe have debated the possible interpretations of the complex plot, but little has been said about how composer Sagisu Shiro's score might contribute to understanding the series. Anno's rehabilitation in a Jungian clinic and subsequent personal study of human psychology plays heavily into understanding the main character Ikari Shinji, and music has much to contribute to appreciating Shinji's view of the world. Shinji is an impressionable fourteen-year old boy, so his musical interpretations of the people and things around him do not always match reality. Sagisu's music gives the viewers welcome insight into Shinji's thoughts and feelings as he matures throughout the series.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
cartoon; Neon Genesis Evangelion; Sagisu Shiro; soundtrack; Music; anime; Anno Hideaki
Degree Name:
M.M.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brobeck, John T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAesthetics of Destruction: Music and the Worldview of Ikari Shinji in Neon Genesis Evangelionen_US
dc.creatorHoffer, Heikeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoffer, Heikeen_US
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseThesis not available (per author's request)en_US
dc.description.abstractDirector Anno Hideaki's series Neon Genesis Evangelion caused a sensation when it first aired on TV Tokyo in 1995 and has become one of the most influential anime ever made. Since its premiere, fans across the globe have debated the possible interpretations of the complex plot, but little has been said about how composer Sagisu Shiro's score might contribute to understanding the series. Anno's rehabilitation in a Jungian clinic and subsequent personal study of human psychology plays heavily into understanding the main character Ikari Shinji, and music has much to contribute to appreciating Shinji's view of the world. Shinji is an impressionable fourteen-year old boy, so his musical interpretations of the people and things around him do not always match reality. Sagisu's music gives the viewers welcome insight into Shinji's thoughts and feelings as he matures throughout the series.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectcartoonen_US
dc.subjectNeon Genesis Evangelionen_US
dc.subjectSagisu Shiroen_US
dc.subjectsoundtracken_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectanimeen_US
dc.subjectAnno Hideakien_US
thesis.degree.nameM.M.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrobeck, John T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSturman, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenblatt, Jayen_US
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