An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Multiple Approaches to Long-Term Change Detection Applicable to Southwestern United States: A Case Study of the San Simon Watershed

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228471
Title:
An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Multiple Approaches to Long-Term Change Detection Applicable to Southwestern United States: A Case Study of the San Simon Watershed
Author:
Garcia, Denise Tanya
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Watersheds in the Southwest, particularly the San Simon Watershed in Arizona, have been experiencing degradation since the turn of the century through processes of erosion and vegetation change. Mitigation and management actions rely on long-term assessment of landcover change; however, traditional methods of ground assessment are time-consuming and specific to particular sites. Remote sensing techniques can be an alternative method to assess landcover change over extensive areas. Forage inventory surveys and historical monitoring data were assessed for utility in landcover change detection. The contemporary remotely-sensed classifications included 2001 SwReGAP data and a CART classification of 2010 Landsat TM data. The CART classification was aided by shrub cover analysis of NAIP aerial photography. It was found that 1930s Grazing inventories were compatible with contemporary satellite image classifications for large-scale landcover change detection.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
land cover change; rangelands; shrub encroachment; vegetation change detection; Natural Resources; desertification; erosion
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Orr, Barron J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Multiple Approaches to Long-Term Change Detection Applicable to Southwestern United States: A Case Study of the San Simon Watersheden_US
dc.creatorGarcia, Denise Tanyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Denise Tanyaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWatersheds in the Southwest, particularly the San Simon Watershed in Arizona, have been experiencing degradation since the turn of the century through processes of erosion and vegetation change. Mitigation and management actions rely on long-term assessment of landcover change; however, traditional methods of ground assessment are time-consuming and specific to particular sites. Remote sensing techniques can be an alternative method to assess landcover change over extensive areas. Forage inventory surveys and historical monitoring data were assessed for utility in landcover change detection. The contemporary remotely-sensed classifications included 2001 SwReGAP data and a CART classification of 2010 Landsat TM data. The CART classification was aided by shrub cover analysis of NAIP aerial photography. It was found that 1930s Grazing inventories were compatible with contemporary satellite image classifications for large-scale landcover change detection.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectland cover changeen_US
dc.subjectrangelandsen_US
dc.subjectshrub encroachmenten_US
dc.subjectvegetation change detectionen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectdesertificationen_US
dc.subjecterosionen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOrr, Barron J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuart E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichols, Mary H.en_US
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