Becoming Guatemalan-De Refugiada a Guatemalteca: The Counterinsurgency War and the Politics of Gender and Memory

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228466
Title:
Becoming Guatemalan-De Refugiada a Guatemalteca: The Counterinsurgency War and the Politics of Gender and Memory
Author:
Ronald, Rachael Leigh
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Spanning 1982-1985, the Counterinsurgency War was the violent period of the county's thirty-six year civil war. The army under General Efrian Rios Montt targeted the Maya villages and communities throughout the Guatemalan Highlands with more than 400 recorded massacres in just a three year span. At the center of this study is the population of Guatemalans that left their country as refugees and later came back as retornados. The term retornado, reflected an emerging identity that stemmed from the new and transformative experiences of exile in Mexico. Their direct negotiations with the government reflected the new skills, organizational ability, and political capital that challenged the distribution of power in the family, community, and nation upon their return. The emergence of women's organizations demonstrated not only a shift in the politics of citizenship rights and inclusion, but also Latin American women's unique contributions to the development of feminist discourse.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Mexico; Refugee; History; Feminism; Guatemala
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pieper-Mooney, Jadwiga

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBecoming Guatemalan-De Refugiada a Guatemalteca: The Counterinsurgency War and the Politics of Gender and Memoryen_US
dc.creatorRonald, Rachael Leighen_US
dc.contributor.authorRonald, Rachael Leighen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSpanning 1982-1985, the Counterinsurgency War was the violent period of the county's thirty-six year civil war. The army under General Efrian Rios Montt targeted the Maya villages and communities throughout the Guatemalan Highlands with more than 400 recorded massacres in just a three year span. At the center of this study is the population of Guatemalans that left their country as refugees and later came back as retornados. The term retornado, reflected an emerging identity that stemmed from the new and transformative experiences of exile in Mexico. Their direct negotiations with the government reflected the new skills, organizational ability, and political capital that challenged the distribution of power in the family, community, and nation upon their return. The emergence of women's organizations demonstrated not only a shift in the politics of citizenship rights and inclusion, but also Latin American women's unique contributions to the development of feminist discourse.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectRefugeeen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectFeminismen_US
dc.subjectGuatemalaen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPieper-Mooney, Jadwigaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeezley, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOglesby, Elizabethen_US
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