Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228463
Title:
Word Frequency Effects in L2 Speakers: An ERP Study
Author:
Famoyegun, Akinjide
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The brain's neural responses to words of different frequencies provide information on lexical organization and the cognitive processes involved in word identification and retrieval of meaning. Monolingual research has shown that exposure to high frequency words yields less cognitive difficulty than low frequency words as demonstrated by smaller N400 waves within even-related potential (ERP) methodology. The purpose of the present study was to compare frequency effects in adult native (L1) and non-native (L2) speakers of English during a sentence reading task embedded with high and low frequency word-pairs. Both L1 and L2 groups produced N400 waves of larger amplitudes for high frequency words compared to low frequency words that peaked around the 400 ms time mark. Group comparison found no significant difference in N400 wave amplitude and peak latency between both groups. The results are discussed with respect to theories of L2 word learning and lexical organization.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
word frequency; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; ERP; L2
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
DeDe, Gayle

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWord Frequency Effects in L2 Speakers: An ERP Studyen_US
dc.creatorFamoyegun, Akinjideen_US
dc.contributor.authorFamoyegun, Akinjideen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe brain's neural responses to words of different frequencies provide information on lexical organization and the cognitive processes involved in word identification and retrieval of meaning. Monolingual research has shown that exposure to high frequency words yields less cognitive difficulty than low frequency words as demonstrated by smaller N400 waves within even-related potential (ERP) methodology. The purpose of the present study was to compare frequency effects in adult native (L1) and non-native (L2) speakers of English during a sentence reading task embedded with high and low frequency word-pairs. Both L1 and L2 groups produced N400 waves of larger amplitudes for high frequency words compared to low frequency words that peaked around the 400 ms time mark. Group comparison found no significant difference in N400 wave amplitude and peak latency between both groups. The results are discussed with respect to theories of L2 word learning and lexical organization.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectword frequencyen_US
dc.subjectSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectERPen_US
dc.subjectL2en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDeDe, Gayleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDallas, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlt, Maryen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.