Examining the Relationship Between Hydroclimatological Variables and High Flow Events

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228461
Title:
Examining the Relationship Between Hydroclimatological Variables and High Flow Events
Author:
Fliehman, Ryan Mark
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In our study we identify dominant hydroclimatic variables and large-scale patterns that lead to high streamflow events in the Santa Cruz, Salt, and Verde River in Arizona for the period 1979-2009 using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). We used winter (Nov - March) data from the USGS daily streamflow database and 11 variables from the North American Reanalysis (NARR) database, in addition to weather maps from the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC). Using streamflow data, we identify precipitation events that led to the highest 98th percentile of daily streamflow events and find dominant hydroclimatic variables associated with these events. We find that upper level winds and moisture fluxes are dominant variables that characterize events. The dominant mode for all three basins is associated with frontal systems, while the second mode is associated with cut-off upper level low pressure systems. Our goal is to provide forecasting agencies with tools to improve flood forecasting practices.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Streamflow; Variables; Atmospheric Sciences; Hydroclimatic; Principal Component Analysis
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Atmospheric Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dominguez, Francina

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExamining the Relationship Between Hydroclimatological Variables and High Flow Eventsen_US
dc.creatorFliehman, Ryan Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorFliehman, Ryan Marken_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn our study we identify dominant hydroclimatic variables and large-scale patterns that lead to high streamflow events in the Santa Cruz, Salt, and Verde River in Arizona for the period 1979-2009 using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). We used winter (Nov - March) data from the USGS daily streamflow database and 11 variables from the North American Reanalysis (NARR) database, in addition to weather maps from the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC). Using streamflow data, we identify precipitation events that led to the highest 98th percentile of daily streamflow events and find dominant hydroclimatic variables associated with these events. We find that upper level winds and moisture fluxes are dominant variables that characterize events. The dominant mode for all three basins is associated with frontal systems, while the second mode is associated with cut-off upper level low pressure systems. Our goal is to provide forecasting agencies with tools to improve flood forecasting practices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectStreamflowen_US
dc.subjectVariablesen_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectHydroclimaticen_US
dc.subjectPrincipal Component Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDominguez, Francinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCastro, Christopher L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHIrschboeck, Katie K.en_US
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