Critical Race Counterstory as Rhetorical Methodology: Chican@ Academic Experience Told Through Sophistic Argument, Allegory, and Narrative

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228451
Title:
Critical Race Counterstory as Rhetorical Methodology: Chican@ Academic Experience Told Through Sophistic Argument, Allegory, and Narrative
Author:
Martinez, Aja Y.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This work focuses on Chican@ identity in academia and uses CRT counterstory to address topics of cultural displacement, assimilation, the American Dream, and ethnic studies. This research considers where the field of rhetoric and composition currently stands in terms of preparedness to serve a growing Chican@ undergraduate and graduate student population. Through counterstory, I offer strategies that more effectively serve students from non-traditional backgrounds in various spaces and practices such as the composition classroom, faculty mentoring, and programmatic requirements such as second language proficiency exams. Since rhetoric and composition can confront structurally and historically specific racisms--e.g., segregation, lack of access for the racial minority to higher education, ethnocentric curricula--embedded in our field, then we, as teachers, students, and administrators, can strategize ways to achieve social justice in academia for historically marginalized groups. My dissertation is focused on Chican@ undergraduate and graduate students because this is the fastest growing population in the academy and is a group with which I feel I can draw upon my cultural intuition; however, the critical race theoretical, pedagogical, and methodological strategies I make use of in my project can be adapted to assist other historically marginalized groups in academia.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Critical Race Theory; Rhetoric; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Chican@; Counterstory
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Licona, Adela C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCritical Race Counterstory as Rhetorical Methodology: Chican@ Academic Experience Told Through Sophistic Argument, Allegory, and Narrativeen_US
dc.creatorMartinez, Aja Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Aja Y.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work focuses on Chican@ identity in academia and uses CRT counterstory to address topics of cultural displacement, assimilation, the American Dream, and ethnic studies. This research considers where the field of rhetoric and composition currently stands in terms of preparedness to serve a growing Chican@ undergraduate and graduate student population. Through counterstory, I offer strategies that more effectively serve students from non-traditional backgrounds in various spaces and practices such as the composition classroom, faculty mentoring, and programmatic requirements such as second language proficiency exams. Since rhetoric and composition can confront structurally and historically specific racisms--e.g., segregation, lack of access for the racial minority to higher education, ethnocentric curricula--embedded in our field, then we, as teachers, students, and administrators, can strategize ways to achieve social justice in academia for historically marginalized groups. My dissertation is focused on Chican@ undergraduate and graduate students because this is the fastest growing population in the academy and is a group with which I feel I can draw upon my cultural intuition; however, the critical race theoretical, pedagogical, and methodological strategies I make use of in my project can be adapted to assist other historically marginalized groups in academia.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCritical Race Theoryen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
dc.subjectChican@en_US
dc.subjectCounterstoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLicona, Adela C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCardenas, Maritza E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVillanueva, Victor, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en_US
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