Re-Imagining the Landscape: Persistent Ideologies and Indelible Marks Upon the Land

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228163
Title:
Re-Imagining the Landscape: Persistent Ideologies and Indelible Marks Upon the Land
Author:
Stuart-Richard, Gina D.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Land is a critical element in the formation of, maintenance and continuance of Native identity to tribes in North America. Since time immemorial, Native people have occupied these landscapes in a manner than can perhaps be best described as "persistent." Native views of the land can differ significantly from those of a Western, or Anglo-American tradition. And when managers of these lands come from a Western tradition, dissimilar views on how these lands should be used can become very problematic for Native people. This research examines how five tribes (Pueblo of Acoma, the Hopi Tribe, Pueblo of Laguna, Navajo Nation and Pueblo of Zuni) view their identity and future cultural continuity as their ancestral homelands are inundated by competing uranium mining interests that threaten to destroy the Mount Taylor landscape of northern New Mexico.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Cultural Landscapes; Mount Taylor; Native Identity; Traditional Cultural Properties; American Indian Studies; Ancestral Landscapes; Cultural Continuity
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ferguson, T. J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRe-Imagining the Landscape: Persistent Ideologies and Indelible Marks Upon the Landen_US
dc.creatorStuart-Richard, Gina D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStuart-Richard, Gina D.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLand is a critical element in the formation of, maintenance and continuance of Native identity to tribes in North America. Since time immemorial, Native people have occupied these landscapes in a manner than can perhaps be best described as "persistent." Native views of the land can differ significantly from those of a Western, or Anglo-American tradition. And when managers of these lands come from a Western tradition, dissimilar views on how these lands should be used can become very problematic for Native people. This research examines how five tribes (Pueblo of Acoma, the Hopi Tribe, Pueblo of Laguna, Navajo Nation and Pueblo of Zuni) view their identity and future cultural continuity as their ancestral homelands are inundated by competing uranium mining interests that threaten to destroy the Mount Taylor landscape of northern New Mexico.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectCultural Landscapesen_US
dc.subjectMount Tayloren_US
dc.subjectNative Identityen_US
dc.subjectTraditional Cultural Propertiesen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAncestral Landscapesen_US
dc.subjectCultural Continuityen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFerguson, T. J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParezo, Nancy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZedeno, Maria N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benedict J.en_US
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