Evapotranspiraton Partitioning Using Stable Water Isotopes in a Semi-Arid Evergreen Forest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228162
Title:
Evapotranspiraton Partitioning Using Stable Water Isotopes in a Semi-Arid Evergreen Forest
Author:
Meuth, Jacob
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Total evapotranspiration (ET) is the key process that links the land and the atmosphere via water, energy and carbon exchange. ET is a combination of evaporation and transpiration, which behave dynamically in very different ways. In this work we investigate the relative contribution of transpiration and soil evaporation to total ET in a semi-wooded, semi-arid forest in the Manitou Research Park northwest of Colorado Springs, CO. We use stable water isotopes measured at different levels within and outside the canopy, over a 30-day period (June 26 - July 26, 2010), using a field-deployable cavity ring-down spectrometer. The traditional "Keeling plot" analysis is used to partition the ET flux from moisture that comes from outside of the ecosystem, and then a simple model is used to partition the transpiration flux. In addition, we introduce a new alternative "multi-level" method to calculate the fraction of transpiration to total ET. Both the "Keeling plot" method and the "multi-level" method yield very similar fractions of transpiration to total ET, ranging from about 15% to about 85%. We compare both methodologies and discuss some of the corrections that must be made when measuring with high-frequency field-deployable instruments.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
multi-level; partitioning; transpiration; Atmospheric Sciences; forest; isotopes
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Atmospheric Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dominguez, Francina

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEvapotranspiraton Partitioning Using Stable Water Isotopes in a Semi-Arid Evergreen Foresten_US
dc.creatorMeuth, Jacoben_US
dc.contributor.authorMeuth, Jacoben_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTotal evapotranspiration (ET) is the key process that links the land and the atmosphere via water, energy and carbon exchange. ET is a combination of evaporation and transpiration, which behave dynamically in very different ways. In this work we investigate the relative contribution of transpiration and soil evaporation to total ET in a semi-wooded, semi-arid forest in the Manitou Research Park northwest of Colorado Springs, CO. We use stable water isotopes measured at different levels within and outside the canopy, over a 30-day period (June 26 - July 26, 2010), using a field-deployable cavity ring-down spectrometer. The traditional "Keeling plot" analysis is used to partition the ET flux from moisture that comes from outside of the ecosystem, and then a simple model is used to partition the transpiration flux. In addition, we introduce a new alternative "multi-level" method to calculate the fraction of transpiration to total ET. Both the "Keeling plot" method and the "multi-level" method yield very similar fractions of transpiration to total ET, ranging from about 15% to about 85%. We compare both methodologies and discuss some of the corrections that must be made when measuring with high-frequency field-deployable instruments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectmulti-levelen_US
dc.subjectpartitioningen_US
dc.subjecttranspirationen_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectforesten_US
dc.subjectisotopesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDominguez, Francinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShuttleworth, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcIntosh, Jenniferen_US
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