Racial Identification, Knowledge, and the Politics of Everyday Life in an Arizona Science Classroom: A Linguistic Ethnography

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228119
Title:
Racial Identification, Knowledge, and the Politics of Everyday Life in an Arizona Science Classroom: A Linguistic Ethnography
Author:
O'Connor, Brendan Harold
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is a linguistic ethnography of a high school Astronomy/Oceanography classroom in southern Arizona, where an exceptionally promising, novice, white science teacher and mostly Mexican-American students confronted issues of identity and difference through interactions both related and unrelated to science learning. Through close analysis of video-recorded, naturally-occurring interaction and rich ethnographic description, the study documents how a teacher and students accomplished everyday classroom life, built caring relationships, and pursued scientific inquiry at a time and in a place where nationally- and locally-circulating discourses about immigration and race infused even routine interactions with tension and uncertainty. In their talk, students appropriated elements of racializing discourses, but also used language creatively to "speak back" to commonsense notions about Mexicanness. Careful examination of science-related interactions reveals the participants' negotiation of multiple, intersecting forms of citizenship (i.e., cultural and scientific citizenship) in the classroom, through multidirectional processes of language socialization in which students and the teacher regularly exchanged expert and novice roles. This study offers insight into the continuing relevance of racial, cultural, and linguistic identity to students' experiences of schooling, and sheds new light on classroom discourse, teacher-student relationships, and dimensions of citizenship in science learning, with important implications for teacher preparation and practice.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Language and Identity; Language and Race; Linguistic Anthropology; Science Education; Language, Reading & Culture; Citizenship; Discourse Analysis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wyman, Leisy T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRacial Identification, Knowledge, and the Politics of Everyday Life in an Arizona Science Classroom: A Linguistic Ethnographyen_US
dc.creatorO'Connor, Brendan Harolden_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Brendan Harolden_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a linguistic ethnography of a high school Astronomy/Oceanography classroom in southern Arizona, where an exceptionally promising, novice, white science teacher and mostly Mexican-American students confronted issues of identity and difference through interactions both related and unrelated to science learning. Through close analysis of video-recorded, naturally-occurring interaction and rich ethnographic description, the study documents how a teacher and students accomplished everyday classroom life, built caring relationships, and pursued scientific inquiry at a time and in a place where nationally- and locally-circulating discourses about immigration and race infused even routine interactions with tension and uncertainty. In their talk, students appropriated elements of racializing discourses, but also used language creatively to "speak back" to commonsense notions about Mexicanness. Careful examination of science-related interactions reveals the participants' negotiation of multiple, intersecting forms of citizenship (i.e., cultural and scientific citizenship) in the classroom, through multidirectional processes of language socialization in which students and the teacher regularly exchanged expert and novice roles. This study offers insight into the continuing relevance of racial, cultural, and linguistic identity to students' experiences of schooling, and sheds new light on classroom discourse, teacher-student relationships, and dimensions of citizenship in science learning, with important implications for teacher preparation and practice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage and Identityen_US
dc.subjectLanguage and Raceen_US
dc.subjectLinguistic Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectScience Educationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
dc.subjectCitizenshipen_US
dc.subjectDiscourse Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWyman, Leisy T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzález, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyman, Leisy T.en_US
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