Sensory Processing and Anatomical Organization of the Central Complex in the Flesh Fly, Neobellieria Bullata

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/228115
Title:
Sensory Processing and Anatomical Organization of the Central Complex in the Flesh Fly, Neobellieria Bullata
Author:
Phillips-Portillo, James
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Animals rely on information provided by their senses to perform the complicated series of motor actions that allow them to obtain food and shelter, locate mates, and avoid predators. Interpreting sensory information and using it to guide behavior is one of the principle roles of the nervous system. In the insect brain, a system of midline neuropils called the central complex is thought to be the site at which sensory information is integrated and converted into the signals that initiate or modify motor outputs. This dissertation addresses three important questions for understanding how the central complex processes sensory information and influences behavior. These questions are: 1. What kind of sensory information is represented in the central complex? 2. What is the relationship of central complex neuropils to other brain regions? 3. Are such regions simply relay stations, or do they support computations that contribute to phenomena cautiously ascribed to the central complex, such as visual learning and memory? Using the flesh fly, Neobellieria bullata, intracellular recordings and dye fills were conducted to explore the sensory parameters that are relayed to the central complex. The results of these experiments along with previously published observations suggest that the sensory information relayed to the central complex differs from species to species and is likely matched to the behavior of each. Reconstructions of neurons labeled during intracellular recordings, cobalt injections, Golgi impregnations, immunohistochemistry, and Bodian staining were used to further explore the relationship between the central complex and the superior protocerebrum. These studies suggest that the superior protocerebrum is a complicated computation center, more intricately related to the central complex than has been previously assumed. These results are used to propose a network model for how one circuit in the central complex may perform some of the functions the central complex has experimentally been shown to mediate. The differences between this model and the elaboration of the central complex in vivo suggest that circuits within the central complex also support a variety of other computations. Finally, future experiments are described, investigating the role of the central complex in orientation of migrating monarch butterflies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
insect brain; neuroanatomy; Physiological Sciences; central complex; electrophysiology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Physiological Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Strausfeld, Nicholas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSensory Processing and Anatomical Organization of the Central Complex in the Flesh Fly, Neobellieria Bullataen_US
dc.creatorPhillips-Portillo, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips-Portillo, Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAnimals rely on information provided by their senses to perform the complicated series of motor actions that allow them to obtain food and shelter, locate mates, and avoid predators. Interpreting sensory information and using it to guide behavior is one of the principle roles of the nervous system. In the insect brain, a system of midline neuropils called the central complex is thought to be the site at which sensory information is integrated and converted into the signals that initiate or modify motor outputs. This dissertation addresses three important questions for understanding how the central complex processes sensory information and influences behavior. These questions are: 1. What kind of sensory information is represented in the central complex? 2. What is the relationship of central complex neuropils to other brain regions? 3. Are such regions simply relay stations, or do they support computations that contribute to phenomena cautiously ascribed to the central complex, such as visual learning and memory? Using the flesh fly, Neobellieria bullata, intracellular recordings and dye fills were conducted to explore the sensory parameters that are relayed to the central complex. The results of these experiments along with previously published observations suggest that the sensory information relayed to the central complex differs from species to species and is likely matched to the behavior of each. Reconstructions of neurons labeled during intracellular recordings, cobalt injections, Golgi impregnations, immunohistochemistry, and Bodian staining were used to further explore the relationship between the central complex and the superior protocerebrum. These studies suggest that the superior protocerebrum is a complicated computation center, more intricately related to the central complex than has been previously assumed. These results are used to propose a network model for how one circuit in the central complex may perform some of the functions the central complex has experimentally been shown to mediate. The differences between this model and the elaboration of the central complex in vivo suggest that circuits within the central complex also support a variety of other computations. Finally, future experiments are described, investigating the role of the central complex in orientation of migrating monarch butterflies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectinsect brainen_US
dc.subjectneuroanatomyen_US
dc.subjectPhysiological Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectcentral complexen_US
dc.subjectelectrophysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGronenberg, Wulfilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHiggins, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
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