Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/227293
Title:
Roots and Correspondence: Denominal Verbs in Modern Hebrew
Author:
Ussishkin, Adam
Editors:
Maye, Jessica; Miyashita, Mizuki
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Cruz
Publisher:
Department of Linguistics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/227293
Abstract:
Modern Hebrew exhibits a derivational process known as Denominai Verb Formation (DVF) whereby a base form, usually a noun, may become a verb. This process has been analyzed by several researchers (Bat-El 1994, Gafos 1995, Sharvit 1994) but to date a comprehensive, principled account has not been proposed. In this paper, it is my aim to present such a principled account of DVF, within Optimality Theory (Prince & Smolensky 1993). This account crucially relies on the consonantal root, arguing against the proposal of Bat-El (1994) that the root plays no role in DVF. In addition, I propose to capture the well known effects of left-to-right spreading attested throughout Semitic (McCarthy 1979, 1981, et seq.) using a new form of Anchor constraints. These new Anchor constraints will be useful in accounting for cases of consonant doubling, which is attested in a subset of Modern Hebrew denominai verbs. Finally, I show that Bat-El's (1994) arguments against the consonantal root can be recast as reasons to adopt a separate dimension of correspondence relations in the analysis: namely, the dimension of Output-Output Correspondence, following work of, e.g., Benua (1995, 1997) and Burzio (1996).
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Optimality theory (Linguistics); Grammar, comparative and general -- Phonology
Series/Report no.:
Proceedings of the 4th Annual Southwest Workshop on Optimality Theory; Coyote Papers; Proceedings of SWOT IV; Arizona Phonology Conference Vol. 6

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUssishkin, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.editorMaye, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.editorMiyashita, Mizukien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-01T19:31:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-01T19:31:38Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/227293-
dc.description.abstractModern Hebrew exhibits a derivational process known as Denominai Verb Formation (DVF) whereby a base form, usually a noun, may become a verb. This process has been analyzed by several researchers (Bat-El 1994, Gafos 1995, Sharvit 1994) but to date a comprehensive, principled account has not been proposed. In this paper, it is my aim to present such a principled account of DVF, within Optimality Theory (Prince & Smolensky 1993). This account crucially relies on the consonantal root, arguing against the proposal of Bat-El (1994) that the root plays no role in DVF. In addition, I propose to capture the well known effects of left-to-right spreading attested throughout Semitic (McCarthy 1979, 1981, et seq.) using a new form of Anchor constraints. These new Anchor constraints will be useful in accounting for cases of consonant doubling, which is attested in a subset of Modern Hebrew denominai verbs. Finally, I show that Bat-El's (1994) arguments against the consonantal root can be recast as reasons to adopt a separate dimension of correspondence relations in the analysis: namely, the dimension of Output-Output Correspondence, following work of, e.g., Benua (1995, 1997) and Burzio (1996).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDepartment of Linguistics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the 4th Annual Southwest Workshop on Optimality Theoryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCoyote Papersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of SWOT IVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesArizona Phonology Conference Vol. 6-
dc.subjectOptimality theory (Linguistics)en_US
dc.subjectGrammar, comparative and general -- Phonologyen_US
dc.titleRoots and Correspondence: Denominal Verbs in Modern Hebrewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of California, Santa Cruzen_US
dc.identifier.oclc53044576-
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