Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223841
Title:
Girdling "Fairchild" Mandarins and "Lisbon" Lemons to Improve Fruit Size
Author:
Wright, Glenn C.
Affiliation:
Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
Oct-2000
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Citrus and Deciduous Fruit and Nut Research Report
Abstract:
'Fairchild' mandarins in the Phoenix area and 'Lisbon' lemons in Yuma were girdled beginning in November 1996. November, March and May girdling of the mandarins led to the greatest yield the first year, while March and May girdling led to the greatest yield in years 2 and 3. March girdling yield increases were generally due to greater fruit numbers, while in May, yield increases were due to greater fruit numbers and fruit size. Returns per acre suggest that March and or May girdling of mandarins will lead to greater profits for the grower. Like mandarins, lemon yields were greater following November, or November and March girdling after one year of the experiment. However, yields of these trees dropped considerably the second year, and the trees appear to be in an alternate bearing cycle. No lemon girdling treatment appears to be better than the untreated trees after three years.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Citrus fruits -- Arizona; Lemon -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
AZ1178; Series P-123

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleGirdling "Fairchild" Mandarins and "Lisbon" Lemons to Improve Fruit Sizeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Glenn C.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentYuma Mesa Agriculture Center, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued2000-10-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCitrus and Deciduous Fruit and Nut Research Reporten_US
dc.description.abstract'Fairchild' mandarins in the Phoenix area and 'Lisbon' lemons in Yuma were girdled beginning in November 1996. November, March and May girdling of the mandarins led to the greatest yield the first year, while March and May girdling led to the greatest yield in years 2 and 3. March girdling yield increases were generally due to greater fruit numbers, while in May, yield increases were due to greater fruit numbers and fruit size. Returns per acre suggest that March and or May girdling of mandarins will lead to greater profits for the grower. Like mandarins, lemon yields were greater following November, or November and March girdling after one year of the experiment. However, yields of these trees dropped considerably the second year, and the trees appear to be in an alternate bearing cycle. No lemon girdling treatment appears to be better than the untreated trees after three years.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCitrus fruits -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectLemon -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/223841-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1178en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-123en_US
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