Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223655
Title:
Relative Susceptibility of Citrus Thrips Nymphs and Adults to Insecticides
Author:
Kerns, David L.
Issue Date:
Nov-2002
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Citrus and Deciduous Fruit and Nut Research Report
Abstract:
Agri-Mek, Assail, Baythroid, Carzol, and Success were all evaluated for their activity towards citrus thrips nymphs relative to adults. Based on leaf dip bioassays, Dimethoate was approximately 3 times more toxic to the adults than to the nymphs. However with leaf dip bioassays, a 3-fold difference, although statistically significant, is usually inconsequential. Success was the only insecticide that demonstrated a noteworthy difference in toxicity to nymphs compared to adults in the bioassay; it was 45 times more toxic to the nymphs than to the adults. Based on X2 contingency tables, lemon trees treated with Carzol, Success, or Baythroid all had significantly lower percentages of nymphs relative to the untreated control. Based on these data, when the citrus thrips population is composed primarily of nymphs, citrus growers and pest control advisors might consider using Carzol, Success, or Baythroid since they appear to impact the nymph population more than the adult population.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Citrus fruits -- Arizona; Citrus -- Insects
Series/Report no.:
AZ1303; Series P-133
Sponsors:
Arizona Citrus Research Council

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleRelative Susceptibility of Citrus Thrips Nymphs and Adults to Insecticidesen_US
dc.contributor.authorKerns, David L.en_US
dc.date.issued2002-11-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCitrus and Deciduous Fruit and Nut Research Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractAgri-Mek, Assail, Baythroid, Carzol, and Success were all evaluated for their activity towards citrus thrips nymphs relative to adults. Based on leaf dip bioassays, Dimethoate was approximately 3 times more toxic to the adults than to the nymphs. However with leaf dip bioassays, a 3-fold difference, although statistically significant, is usually inconsequential. Success was the only insecticide that demonstrated a noteworthy difference in toxicity to nymphs compared to adults in the bioassay; it was 45 times more toxic to the nymphs than to the adults. Based on X2 contingency tables, lemon trees treated with Carzol, Success, or Baythroid all had significantly lower percentages of nymphs relative to the untreated control. Based on these data, when the citrus thrips population is composed primarily of nymphs, citrus growers and pest control advisors might consider using Carzol, Success, or Baythroid since they appear to impact the nymph population more than the adult population.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCitrus fruits -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCitrus -- Insectsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/223655-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1303en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-133en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipArizona Citrus Research Councilen_US
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