Reconnection to Gila River Akimel O'odham History and Culture Through Development of a User-Friendly O'odham Writing Method

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223373
Title:
Reconnection to Gila River Akimel O'odham History and Culture Through Development of a User-Friendly O'odham Writing Method
Author:
Johns, Duncan Eric
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
At one time before European contact Indigenous groups flourished on the American continent and maintained their ideas of conveying knowledge, history, and beliefs through the oral tradition. It is widely concluded that hundreds of Native languages were spoken to convey the aspects related above, which were unique and specific to each individual tribe. With the colonization of the American continent by European peoples, came the beginning of the end of the Indian way of life. Because of this reality and circumstances that were yet to be endured by Indigenous groups, the destruction of many Native languages also occurred over time. Presently, only a few hundred Indigenous languages have survived. In the effort at preserving some of the remaining Indigenous languages, writing systems which often have a foundation in non-Native higher academia have been developed for some; O'odham being one. This paper examines developing a more grassroots O'odham writing system.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
method; O'odham; River; writing; American Indian Studies; Gila; grassroots
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zepeda, Ofelia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReconnection to Gila River Akimel O'odham History and Culture Through Development of a User-Friendly O'odham Writing Methoden_US
dc.creatorJohns, Duncan Ericen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohns, Duncan Ericen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAt one time before European contact Indigenous groups flourished on the American continent and maintained their ideas of conveying knowledge, history, and beliefs through the oral tradition. It is widely concluded that hundreds of Native languages were spoken to convey the aspects related above, which were unique and specific to each individual tribe. With the colonization of the American continent by European peoples, came the beginning of the end of the Indian way of life. Because of this reality and circumstances that were yet to be endured by Indigenous groups, the destruction of many Native languages also occurred over time. Presently, only a few hundred Indigenous languages have survived. In the effort at preserving some of the remaining Indigenous languages, writing systems which often have a foundation in non-Native higher academia have been developed for some; O'odham being one. This paper examines developing a more grassroots O'odham writing system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectmethoden_US
dc.subjectO'odhamen_US
dc.subjectRiveren_US
dc.subjectwritingen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectGilaen_US
dc.subjectgrassrootsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZepeda, Ofeliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRinding In, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWillie, Mayen_US
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