Deconstructing the Role of Expectations in Cooperative Behavior with Decision Neuroscience

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223343
Title:
Deconstructing the Role of Expectations in Cooperative Behavior with Decision Neuroscience
Author:
Chang, Luke Joseph
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project attempts to understand the role of expectations in cooperative behavior using the interdisciplinary approach of Decision Neuroscience. While cooperation provides the foundation for a successful society, the underlying bio-psycho-social mechanisms remain surprisingly poorly understood. This investigation deconstructs cooperation into the specific behaviors of trust, reciprocation, and norm enforcement using the Trust and Ultimatum Games from behavioral economics and combines formal modeling and functional magnetic resonance imaging to understand the neurocomputational role of expectations in these behaviors. The results indicate that people appear to use context specific shared expectations when making social decisions. These beliefs are malleable and appear to be dynamically updated after an interaction. Emotions such as guilt and anger can be formally operationalized in terms of others' expectations and appear to be processed by a specific neural system involving the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and supplemental motor cortex. Importantly, these neural signals appear to motivate people to not only behave consistent with these expectations, but also to help others update their beliefs when these expectations are violated. Further, violations of social expectations appear to promote enhanced memory for norm violators. This work demonstrates the neural and computational basis of moral sentiments.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Emotion; Expectations; Neuroeconomics; Social; Psychology; Cooperation; Decision Neuroscience
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sanfrey, Alan G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDeconstructing the Role of Expectations in Cooperative Behavior with Decision Neuroscienceen_US
dc.creatorChang, Luke Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, Luke Josephen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project attempts to understand the role of expectations in cooperative behavior using the interdisciplinary approach of Decision Neuroscience. While cooperation provides the foundation for a successful society, the underlying bio-psycho-social mechanisms remain surprisingly poorly understood. This investigation deconstructs cooperation into the specific behaviors of trust, reciprocation, and norm enforcement using the Trust and Ultimatum Games from behavioral economics and combines formal modeling and functional magnetic resonance imaging to understand the neurocomputational role of expectations in these behaviors. The results indicate that people appear to use context specific shared expectations when making social decisions. These beliefs are malleable and appear to be dynamically updated after an interaction. Emotions such as guilt and anger can be formally operationalized in terms of others' expectations and appear to be processed by a specific neural system involving the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and supplemental motor cortex. Importantly, these neural signals appear to motivate people to not only behave consistent with these expectations, but also to help others update their beliefs when these expectations are violated. Further, violations of social expectations appear to promote enhanced memory for norm violators. This work demonstrates the neural and computational basis of moral sentiments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEmotionen_US
dc.subjectExpectationsen_US
dc.subjectNeuroeconomicsen_US
dc.subjectSocialen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCooperationen_US
dc.subjectDecision Neuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSanfrey, Alan G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, Daveen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanfrey, Alan G.en_US
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