"Too Cool for School": The Impact of School Resistance and Self-Monitoring Strategies on Latino Male Student Achievement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223333
Title:
"Too Cool for School": The Impact of School Resistance and Self-Monitoring Strategies on Latino Male Student Achievement
Author:
Covarrubias, Rebecca Guzman
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Latino male students lag far behind their Latina and European American counterparts in academic achievement (Yosso & Solorzano, 2006; Moll & Ruiz, 2002). One potential explanation for this discrepancy is the pressure to resist school behaviors (Fordham & Ogbu, 1986) that Latino male students may encounter from their same-sex and same-ethnic peer group members. The current dissertation research explores how messages of school resistance from peers impact Latino student achievement and how self-monitoring strategies (i.e., regulating one's behaviors; Snyder, 1974) may provide a coping strategy for this school resistance. In Study 1, Latino and European American male and female undergraduate students (N=95) completed peer school resistance items and reported GPAs. Analyses revealed that while male students reported higher perceptions of peer school resistance than female students, peer school resistance was only negatively correlated with achievement for Latino male students, and was unrelated to achievement for European American male students. In Study 2, Latino and European American male and female undergraduate students (N=413) completed self-monitoring items and reported SAT math scores. Analyses revealed that self-monitoring strategies were positively correlated with achievement for Latino male students, but were unrelated to achievement for Latina and European American male and female students. While Studies 1 and 2 used correlational methods, in Study 3, Latino high school students (N=174) who were randomly assigned to read messages of high or low peer school resistance completed self-monitoring items, thoughts about achievement items, and an achievement task (i.e., AIMS math items). Analyses revealed that high peer school resistance encouraged Latino male students to present more negative thoughts about achievement compared to low peer school resistance. Additionally, self-monitoring was positively related to achievement for Latino male students. Peer school resistance and self-monitoring had no effects on Latina students' thoughts or achievement. These findings demonstrate the negative impact of peer school resistance on Latino male student achievement, and the positive effects of self-monitoring on achievement for this cultural group. This research aims to offer new perspectives on the Latino male student achievement gap. Implications for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Peer Groups; School Resistance; Self-Monitoring Strategies; Psychology; Academic Achievement; Latino Student
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stone, Jeff

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.title"Too Cool for School": The Impact of School Resistance and Self-Monitoring Strategies on Latino Male Student Achievementen_US
dc.creatorCovarrubias, Rebecca Guzmanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCovarrubias, Rebecca Guzmanen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLatino male students lag far behind their Latina and European American counterparts in academic achievement (Yosso & Solorzano, 2006; Moll & Ruiz, 2002). One potential explanation for this discrepancy is the pressure to resist school behaviors (Fordham & Ogbu, 1986) that Latino male students may encounter from their same-sex and same-ethnic peer group members. The current dissertation research explores how messages of school resistance from peers impact Latino student achievement and how self-monitoring strategies (i.e., regulating one's behaviors; Snyder, 1974) may provide a coping strategy for this school resistance. In Study 1, Latino and European American male and female undergraduate students (N=95) completed peer school resistance items and reported GPAs. Analyses revealed that while male students reported higher perceptions of peer school resistance than female students, peer school resistance was only negatively correlated with achievement for Latino male students, and was unrelated to achievement for European American male students. In Study 2, Latino and European American male and female undergraduate students (N=413) completed self-monitoring items and reported SAT math scores. Analyses revealed that self-monitoring strategies were positively correlated with achievement for Latino male students, but were unrelated to achievement for Latina and European American male and female students. While Studies 1 and 2 used correlational methods, in Study 3, Latino high school students (N=174) who were randomly assigned to read messages of high or low peer school resistance completed self-monitoring items, thoughts about achievement items, and an achievement task (i.e., AIMS math items). Analyses revealed that high peer school resistance encouraged Latino male students to present more negative thoughts about achievement compared to low peer school resistance. Additionally, self-monitoring was positively related to achievement for Latino male students. Peer school resistance and self-monitoring had no effects on Latina students' thoughts or achievement. These findings demonstrate the negative impact of peer school resistance on Latino male student achievement, and the positive effects of self-monitoring on achievement for this cultural group. This research aims to offer new perspectives on the Latino male student achievement gap. Implications for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPeer Groupsen_US
dc.subjectSchool Resistanceen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Monitoring Strategiesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectAcademic Achievementen_US
dc.subjectLatino Studenten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStone, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStone, Jeffen_US
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