Puaxant Tuvip: Powerlands Southern Paiute Cultural Landscapes and Pilgrimage Trails

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223332
Title:
Puaxant Tuvip: Powerlands Southern Paiute Cultural Landscapes and Pilgrimage Trails
Author:
Van Vlack, Kathleen A.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Southern Paiute people stipulate that when the world was formed, the Creator gave them sole possession of the lands that constitute the traditional Southern Paiute nation and the Creator gave them the responsibilities to tend to the land, resources, and each other. As a result, from these stewardship duties, Southern Paiute people developed complex socio-ecological methods for promoting and maintaining both ecological and spiritual balance. One method was used by medicine people or Puha'gants and it involved them traveling to special ceremonial areas to acquire knowledge and power. These journeys required Puha'gants to undergo intense purification and preparation and they traveled along designated trails to places far away from their home communities. The pilgrimage process allowed the pilgrims to gain knowledge and power at their destination places to use in ceremonies to restore balance and promote sustainability in their home communities. My dissertation study examines six pilgrimage trails across Southern Paiute territory in an effort to understand this process. As a way to frame my discussion, this analysis draws upon four concepts--(1) Southern Paiute place logic, (2) cultural landscapes, (3) pilgrimage, and (4) communitas. For trail systems under study, I examine the types of places visited and their associated performance characteristics, and specifically the types of relationships pilgrims, or Puhahivats with each other, the places visited, and objects used.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Pilgrimage Trails; Southern Paiute; American Indian Studies; Communitas; Cultural Landscapes
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoffle, Richard W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePuaxant Tuvip: Powerlands Southern Paiute Cultural Landscapes and Pilgrimage Trailsen_US
dc.creatorVan Vlack, Kathleen A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Vlack, Kathleen A.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSouthern Paiute people stipulate that when the world was formed, the Creator gave them sole possession of the lands that constitute the traditional Southern Paiute nation and the Creator gave them the responsibilities to tend to the land, resources, and each other. As a result, from these stewardship duties, Southern Paiute people developed complex socio-ecological methods for promoting and maintaining both ecological and spiritual balance. One method was used by medicine people or Puha'gants and it involved them traveling to special ceremonial areas to acquire knowledge and power. These journeys required Puha'gants to undergo intense purification and preparation and they traveled along designated trails to places far away from their home communities. The pilgrimage process allowed the pilgrims to gain knowledge and power at their destination places to use in ceremonies to restore balance and promote sustainability in their home communities. My dissertation study examines six pilgrimage trails across Southern Paiute territory in an effort to understand this process. As a way to frame my discussion, this analysis draws upon four concepts--(1) Southern Paiute place logic, (2) cultural landscapes, (3) pilgrimage, and (4) communitas. For trail systems under study, I examine the types of places visited and their associated performance characteristics, and specifically the types of relationships pilgrims, or Puhahivats with each other, the places visited, and objects used.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPilgrimage Trailsen_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectCommunitasen_US
dc.subjectCultural Landscapesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benedicten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaro, Mamadouen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParezo, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLomawaima, Tsianinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStoffle, Richard W.en_US
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