Assessment of the Survival of Microbial Pathogens in the Environment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/223315
Title:
Assessment of the Survival of Microbial Pathogens in the Environment
Author:
Williams, David Lee
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The studies presented here evaluate the survival of different types of pathogens in a variety of environments. The study Appendix A focuses on the presence of enteric bacteria in reusable shopping bags. We demonstrated that ninety-seven percent of individuals surveyed never washed their reusable shopping bags and that this lack of washing can lead to the buildup of potentially harmful bacteria such as Salmonella spp. The hand-washing of the bags was shown to reduce seeded organisms to below detectable limits. Appendix B examines the survival of Bacillus altrophaeus endospores during household laundering. It was demonstrated that detergent alone didn't significantly reduce the number of viable endospores or their spread to other garments and that bleach is necessary to significantly reduce the number of viable endospores and their spread. Risks for infection were significantly lower when bleach was used during laundering. Appendix C details the survival of Ascaris ova in biosolid-amended Brazito sandy loam and clay loam. Survival of Ascaris ova was significantly higher in clay soil and ova inactivation increased with increasing temperature. The risk for Ascaris infection from consuming raw lettuce grown on such soils was calculated and it was found that annual risks for infection decreased significantly with time after harvest.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Microbiology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssessment of the Survival of Microbial Pathogens in the Environmenten_US
dc.creatorWilliams, David Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, David Leeen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe studies presented here evaluate the survival of different types of pathogens in a variety of environments. The study Appendix A focuses on the presence of enteric bacteria in reusable shopping bags. We demonstrated that ninety-seven percent of individuals surveyed never washed their reusable shopping bags and that this lack of washing can lead to the buildup of potentially harmful bacteria such as Salmonella spp. The hand-washing of the bags was shown to reduce seeded organisms to below detectable limits. Appendix B examines the survival of Bacillus altrophaeus endospores during household laundering. It was demonstrated that detergent alone didn't significantly reduce the number of viable endospores or their spread to other garments and that bleach is necessary to significantly reduce the number of viable endospores and their spread. Risks for infection were significantly lower when bleach was used during laundering. Appendix C details the survival of Ascaris ova in biosolid-amended Brazito sandy loam and clay loam. Survival of Ascaris ova was significantly higher in clay soil and ova inactivation increased with increasing temperature. The risk for Ascaris infection from consuming raw lettuce grown on such soils was calculated and it was found that annual risks for infection decreased significantly with time after harvest.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBright, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJoens, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReggiardo, Carlosen_US
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