The Temporary Nature of Health: The Humoral Body in Early Modern Drama

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/222851
Title:
The Temporary Nature of Health: The Humoral Body in Early Modern Drama
Author:
Headley, Cynthia Marie
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation Not Available (per Author's Request) / University of Arizona affiliates can find this item in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full-text Database
Abstract:
The Temporary Nature of Health: The Humoral Body in Early Modern Drama explores the ways in which drama, political theory, and travel accounts deploy metaphors and practices generated by the humoral body to provide an account for living in a postlapsarian world. This project's interdisciplinary approach builds on the work of Gail Paster and Valerie Traub and analyzes the ways in which understandings of the body both inflect and are inflected by culture. Chapter one, "'Letting' Blood: The Impossibility of Social Health and Stability in Shakespeare and Cary," focuses on metonyms and metaphors of blood, using both Richard II and Elizabeth Cary's The Tragedy of Mariam. Both plays challenge the notion that blood as bloodline metonymically means character fitness and the ability to rule. Chapter two, "The Failure of Authority: Medical Practitioners and Heads of State in The Winter's Tale, All's Well that Ends Well, and Measure for Measure," argues that these plays' central characters fail as healers in their attempts to find balance and stability for others, usually through the comedic conventional ending of marriage. Chapter three, "Pastoral's Temporary Healing: Elizabethan-Jacobean Comedies, Tragicomedies, and Travel Accounts," uses pastoral dramas such as Mary Wroth's Love's Victorie, John Fletcher's The Faithful Shepherdess, and Shakespeare's As You Like It, as well as travel accounts such as Walter Ralegh's A Discourse Concerning Western Planting. This chapter examines the relationship among pastoral drama, humoral understanding of the body, and travel accounts.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
medicine; Renaissance; Shakespeare; travel accounts; English; Christianity; drama
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ulreich, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Temporary Nature of Health: The Humoral Body in Early Modern Dramaen_US
dc.creatorHeadley, Cynthia Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeadley, Cynthia Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation Not Available (per Author's Request) / University of Arizona affiliates can find this item in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full-text Databaseen_US
dc.description.abstractThe Temporary Nature of Health: The Humoral Body in Early Modern Drama explores the ways in which drama, political theory, and travel accounts deploy metaphors and practices generated by the humoral body to provide an account for living in a postlapsarian world. This project's interdisciplinary approach builds on the work of Gail Paster and Valerie Traub and analyzes the ways in which understandings of the body both inflect and are inflected by culture. Chapter one, "'Letting' Blood: The Impossibility of Social Health and Stability in Shakespeare and Cary," focuses on metonyms and metaphors of blood, using both Richard II and Elizabeth Cary's The Tragedy of Mariam. Both plays challenge the notion that blood as bloodline metonymically means character fitness and the ability to rule. Chapter two, "The Failure of Authority: Medical Practitioners and Heads of State in The Winter's Tale, All's Well that Ends Well, and Measure for Measure," argues that these plays' central characters fail as healers in their attempts to find balance and stability for others, usually through the comedic conventional ending of marriage. Chapter three, "Pastoral's Temporary Healing: Elizabethan-Jacobean Comedies, Tragicomedies, and Travel Accounts," uses pastoral dramas such as Mary Wroth's Love's Victorie, John Fletcher's The Faithful Shepherdess, and Shakespeare's As You Like It, as well as travel accounts such as Walter Ralegh's A Discourse Concerning Western Planting. This chapter examines the relationship among pastoral drama, humoral understanding of the body, and travel accounts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmedicineen_US
dc.subjectRenaissanceen_US
dc.subjectShakespeareen_US
dc.subjecttravel accountsen_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectChristianityen_US
dc.subjectdramaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorUlreich, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKiefer, Frederick P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDushane, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUlreich, Johnen_US
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