Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/222850
Title:
A Storied Land: Tiyo and the Epic Journey down the Colorado River
Author:
Hopkins, Maren P.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis evaluates one Hopi oral tradition-Tiyo, the boy from Tokonavi-as a meaningful geographic discourse that reveals a landscape extending from the American Southwest to Mesoamerica and beyond. Hopi's understanding of their past and the significance of the land have evolved within larger struggles between Western and Native American views of time, space, and history. Instead of a static cartographic rendering, the story of Tiyo presents the land as a dynamic entity differentiated through religious and social relations. Theories of place making and materiality help validate a space coterminous with Hopi history and religion, and support a multi-vocal approach to the land. This work has implications for anthropological scholarship, and for the process of decolonizing dominant understandings of Hopi culture. It is equally relevant for historic preservation, indigenous sovereignty, and land claims. Most importantly, this research can assist the Hopi people in communicating cultural knowledge to future generations.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
multi-vocality; oral traditions; place making; positionality; Anthropology; cultural landscape; Hopi
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ferguson, T. J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Storied Land: Tiyo and the Epic Journey down the Colorado Riveren_US
dc.creatorHopkins, Maren P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Maren P.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis evaluates one Hopi oral tradition-Tiyo, the boy from Tokonavi-as a meaningful geographic discourse that reveals a landscape extending from the American Southwest to Mesoamerica and beyond. Hopi's understanding of their past and the significance of the land have evolved within larger struggles between Western and Native American views of time, space, and history. Instead of a static cartographic rendering, the story of Tiyo presents the land as a dynamic entity differentiated through religious and social relations. Theories of place making and materiality help validate a space coterminous with Hopi history and religion, and support a multi-vocal approach to the land. This work has implications for anthropological scholarship, and for the process of decolonizing dominant understandings of Hopi culture. It is equally relevant for historic preservation, indigenous sovereignty, and land claims. Most importantly, this research can assist the Hopi people in communicating cultural knowledge to future generations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectmulti-vocalityen_US
dc.subjectoral traditionsen_US
dc.subjectplace makingen_US
dc.subjectpositionalityen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectcultural landscapeen_US
dc.subjectHopien_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFerguson, T. J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMills, Barbara J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZedeño, M. Nievesen_US
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