Sometimes Freedom Wears a Woman's Face: American Indian Women Veterans of World War II

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/222846
Title:
Sometimes Freedom Wears a Woman's Face: American Indian Women Veterans of World War II
Author:
Bennett, Pamela Diane
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
American Indian women veterans of World War II are the least known group of World War II military veterans. With an estimated wartime enlistment of eight-hundred, these women have not received the academic attention they deserve and very little information on their lives and military experiences has been available. This project addresses this disparity by focusing on certain key questions. What early life experiences influenced these Native women to enlist in the military? Did their experiences affect their adjustment to military life? What were their duty assignments and stations and how did their military experiences influence their life choices in the years after the war? In other words, did their military experiences contribute to or influence their commitment to their communities and to the greater good for indigenous peoples? Equally as important, how did their feelings about the war change over time? What emphasis did they place on their military service? What common themes emerge among these women and do their experiences reflect or differ from those of their Native male counterparts and of other military women during World War II? These questions are approached through an oral history format utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods and theories of collective memory. This project also explores the issue of Native and tribal identities as they influenced these veterans in their decisions regarding military enlistment and community service.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
post wartime experiences; wartime experiences; World War II veterans; History; American Indian women; Native
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Anderson, Karen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSometimes Freedom Wears a Woman's Face: American Indian Women Veterans of World War IIen_US
dc.creatorBennett, Pamela Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Pamela Dianeen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmerican Indian women veterans of World War II are the least known group of World War II military veterans. With an estimated wartime enlistment of eight-hundred, these women have not received the academic attention they deserve and very little information on their lives and military experiences has been available. This project addresses this disparity by focusing on certain key questions. What early life experiences influenced these Native women to enlist in the military? Did their experiences affect their adjustment to military life? What were their duty assignments and stations and how did their military experiences influence their life choices in the years after the war? In other words, did their military experiences contribute to or influence their commitment to their communities and to the greater good for indigenous peoples? Equally as important, how did their feelings about the war change over time? What emphasis did they place on their military service? What common themes emerge among these women and do their experiences reflect or differ from those of their Native male counterparts and of other military women during World War II? These questions are approached through an oral history format utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods and theories of collective memory. This project also explores the issue of Native and tribal identities as they influenced these veterans in their decisions regarding military enlistment and community service.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectpost wartime experiencesen_US
dc.subjectwartime experiencesen_US
dc.subjectWorld War II veteransen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian womenen_US
dc.subjectNativeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrane, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolm, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Karenen_US
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