A Bountiful Harvest: Pueblo of Laguna College Graduates Assessment of Tribal Utilization of Subsidized Academic Capital

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/222832
Title:
A Bountiful Harvest: Pueblo of Laguna College Graduates Assessment of Tribal Utilization of Subsidized Academic Capital
Author:
Graham, Joe L.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Pueblo of Laguna in New Mexico maintains a tribal scholarship program to assist students in their pursuit of higher education. This research was initiated to assess from the graduates' perspective how effectively the tribe utilized its subsidized academic capital. The purpose of the study was to identify obstacles, incentives, distractions, or alternative opportunities that Laguna college graduates encountered on their academic paths that influenced their perceptions about working for the tribe. Several challenges were identified that if addressed could profoundly benefit the tribe by increasing the retention of tribal graduates for the professional roles for which they were academically trained. A mixed methods research design was employed to examine why graduates educated with considerable assistance from their tribe were not working for their tribe in the capacity for which they earned degrees. Within this study, both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to gather, report, and interpret the data. The combined use of a survey as the quantitative method and interviews as the qualitative method provided a balanced view of the perceptions of the Laguna graduates. An analysis of both sets of data indicated that several significant rifts existed between the arenas of tribal professional employment opportunities, college level academic attainment, and the existing secondary school system. Conversely, notions of tribal student loyalty and an intense desire to contribute to community were confirmed. Based on the findings, it was recommended that several critical decisions regarding the future of the Pueblo's higher education priorities be made. Further, it was recommended that the tribe increase their efforts to capitalize on the intrinsic community connectedness demonstrated by the Laguna graduates.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Human Capital Capture; Internal Informative Network; Pueblo of Laguna; Subsidized Academic Capital; Arid Lands Resource Sciences; American Indian College Graduates; Educational Prioritization
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Arid Lands Resource Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hiller, Joseph

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Bountiful Harvest: Pueblo of Laguna College Graduates Assessment of Tribal Utilization of Subsidized Academic Capitalen_US
dc.creatorGraham, Joe L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Joe L.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Pueblo of Laguna in New Mexico maintains a tribal scholarship program to assist students in their pursuit of higher education. This research was initiated to assess from the graduates' perspective how effectively the tribe utilized its subsidized academic capital. The purpose of the study was to identify obstacles, incentives, distractions, or alternative opportunities that Laguna college graduates encountered on their academic paths that influenced their perceptions about working for the tribe. Several challenges were identified that if addressed could profoundly benefit the tribe by increasing the retention of tribal graduates for the professional roles for which they were academically trained. A mixed methods research design was employed to examine why graduates educated with considerable assistance from their tribe were not working for their tribe in the capacity for which they earned degrees. Within this study, both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to gather, report, and interpret the data. The combined use of a survey as the quantitative method and interviews as the qualitative method provided a balanced view of the perceptions of the Laguna graduates. An analysis of both sets of data indicated that several significant rifts existed between the arenas of tribal professional employment opportunities, college level academic attainment, and the existing secondary school system. Conversely, notions of tribal student loyalty and an intense desire to contribute to community were confirmed. Based on the findings, it was recommended that several critical decisions regarding the future of the Pueblo's higher education priorities be made. Further, it was recommended that the tribe increase their efforts to capitalize on the intrinsic community connectedness demonstrated by the Laguna graduates.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHuman Capital Captureen_US
dc.subjectInternal Informative Networken_US
dc.subjectPueblo of Lagunaen_US
dc.subjectSubsidized Academic Capitalen_US
dc.subjectArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian College Graduatesen_US
dc.subjectEducational Prioritizationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHiller, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFish, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrayshield, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFranklin, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHiller, Josephen_US
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