Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/222612
Title:
Three Essays on Product Form Choice
Author:
Frias, Kellilynn M.
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Innovators and high-technology entrepreneurs have three principal options for transforming their innovations into viable business models and deriving value from their innovations. They may: market intellectual know-how (via licensing and/or proof-of-concept), market intermediate products (i.e., sell components/sub-systems), or market end-products (i.e., sell complete systems/solutions). In this dissertation, I aim to contribute to the organizational design and marketing strategy literature with three separate essays that study these fundamental strategy alternatives, which are called "product form choice". In the first essay, I explore product form choices in the context of early-stage and established firms engaged in new product development projects, and generate a theoretical framework that shows (a) how technology, market, and enterprise-resource related factors systematically impact this choice, and (b) how the enterprise coordinates with other actors in its "eco-system" to design, produce, and market effective products/solutions based on the core innovation. The other two essays use two different methodologies and contexts to systematically test some key refutable predictions from the framework developed in Essay 1. In particular, in the second essay, I use simulated experimental scenarios and ordered-choice models to investigate explore product form choices in the context of early-stage ventures seeking angel investor funding to examine the effect of technology, marketing, and firm-level factors on product form decisions. In the third essay, I use primary survey data obtained from executives from firms selling industrial equipment in four industry sectors to study how coordination and safeguarding motives, in conjunction with a firm's unique set of product development resources impact their product form decision.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Strategy; Management; Entrepreneurship; Marketing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ghosh, Mrinal; Lusch, Robert F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThree Essays on Product Form Choiceen_US
dc.creatorFrias, Kellilynn M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrias, Kellilynn M.en_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInnovators and high-technology entrepreneurs have three principal options for transforming their innovations into viable business models and deriving value from their innovations. They may: market intellectual know-how (via licensing and/or proof-of-concept), market intermediate products (i.e., sell components/sub-systems), or market end-products (i.e., sell complete systems/solutions). In this dissertation, I aim to contribute to the organizational design and marketing strategy literature with three separate essays that study these fundamental strategy alternatives, which are called "product form choice". In the first essay, I explore product form choices in the context of early-stage and established firms engaged in new product development projects, and generate a theoretical framework that shows (a) how technology, market, and enterprise-resource related factors systematically impact this choice, and (b) how the enterprise coordinates with other actors in its "eco-system" to design, produce, and market effective products/solutions based on the core innovation. The other two essays use two different methodologies and contexts to systematically test some key refutable predictions from the framework developed in Essay 1. In particular, in the second essay, I use simulated experimental scenarios and ordered-choice models to investigate explore product form choices in the context of early-stage ventures seeking angel investor funding to examine the effect of technology, marketing, and firm-level factors on product form decisions. In the third essay, I use primary survey data obtained from executives from firms selling industrial equipment in four industry sectors to study how coordination and safeguarding motives, in conjunction with a firm's unique set of product development resources impact their product form decision.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectStrategyen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectEntrepreneurshipen_US
dc.subjectMarketingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGhosh, Mrinalen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLusch, Robert F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGantz, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJanakiraman, Narayanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosh, Mrinalen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLusch, Robert F.en_US
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