Relationship Between Maternal Expectations of Perinatal Care and Postpartum Depression

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221420
Title:
Relationship Between Maternal Expectations of Perinatal Care and Postpartum Depression
Author:
Williams, Danielle
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
1-May-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
The incidence of postpartum depression (PPD) is estimated at 13-19%, with effects reaching far beyond the affected mother. However, its precise cause is still unknown. In this double-blinded study, a 30-question Maternal Expectations Survey (MES) was developed to explore the notion that unmet maternal expectations for labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period impose risk factors for PPD. The MES was administered to postpartum women at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center; and scores were compared to those on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), administered 6 weeks postpartum to the same women in the outpatient setting of the clinic of their attending physician. Results of this interim analysis, using Poisson regression models, indicated that there is no significant correlation between total MES score and EPDS score. Two MES queries (relating to spontaneous onset of labor and coping mechanisms during labor) are independently predictive of an increased EPDS score. With attainment of adequate power, other components of the MES may emerge as genuine risk factors for PPD and help identify women who would benefit from earlier-than-usual, pre-emptive postpartum counseling. This study also served to buttress the validity of 5 considering the presence of neonatal health complications as a risk factor for PPD; and, conversely, it identified obstetric complications, neonatal health complications and a recent stressful life event as significant predictors of an increased MES score. Additionally, the presence of a written birth plan is also a significant predictor of increased
MeSH Subjects:
Perinatal Care; Depression, Postpartum
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Mattox, John, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRelationship Between Maternal Expectations of Perinatal Care and Postpartum Depressionen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of postpartum depression (PPD) is estimated at 13-19%, with effects reaching far beyond the affected mother. However, its precise cause is still unknown. In this double-blinded study, a 30-question Maternal Expectations Survey (MES) was developed to explore the notion that unmet maternal expectations for labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period impose risk factors for PPD. The MES was administered to postpartum women at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center; and scores were compared to those on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), administered 6 weeks postpartum to the same women in the outpatient setting of the clinic of their attending physician. Results of this interim analysis, using Poisson regression models, indicated that there is no significant correlation between total MES score and EPDS score. Two MES queries (relating to spontaneous onset of labor and coping mechanisms during labor) are independently predictive of an increased EPDS score. With attainment of adequate power, other components of the MES may emerge as genuine risk factors for PPD and help identify women who would benefit from earlier-than-usual, pre-emptive postpartum counseling. This study also served to buttress the validity of 5 considering the presence of neonatal health complications as a risk factor for PPD; and, conversely, it identified obstetric complications, neonatal health complications and a recent stressful life event as significant predictors of an increased MES score. Additionally, the presence of a written birth plan is also a significant predictor of increaseden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshPerinatal Careen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression, Postpartumen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorMattox, John, MDen_US
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