The CLASE Study: Endovascular Management of the Superficial Femoral Artery

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221411
Title:
The CLASE Study: Endovascular Management of the Superficial Femoral Artery
Author:
Shieh, Hester F.
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
1-May-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives – The purpose of this study was to compare endovascular treatment modalities for peripheral vascular disease in the femoropopliteal arteries with respect to technical success, efficacy, and patency at mid-term follow up. Methods – A retrospective review of patients that underwent endovascular management of the femoropopliteal segment was conducted to evaluate patency. The CLASE study included five treatment arms: cryoplasty, laser, angioplasty/stent, Silverhawk atherectomy, and Viabahn endoluminal graft. Results – Between November 2004 and May 2009, 306 patients met inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant difference in patencies among treatment groups (p=0.016), driven by laser having a significantly lower patency than the angioplasty/stent, Silverhawk atherectomy, and Viabahn endoluminal graft groups. Conclusions – Many of the expensive endovascular devices have poor patencies lasting less than six months. Angioplasty/stent is not inferior to these new devices, and may remain the standard of care.
Keywords:
CLASE Study
MeSH Subjects:
Femoral Artery; Endovascular Procedures
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Rodriguez, Julio, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe CLASE Study: Endovascular Management of the Superficial Femoral Arteryen_US
dc.contributor.authorShieh, Hester F.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives – The purpose of this study was to compare endovascular treatment modalities for peripheral vascular disease in the femoropopliteal arteries with respect to technical success, efficacy, and patency at mid-term follow up. Methods – A retrospective review of patients that underwent endovascular management of the femoropopliteal segment was conducted to evaluate patency. The CLASE study included five treatment arms: cryoplasty, laser, angioplasty/stent, Silverhawk atherectomy, and Viabahn endoluminal graft. Results – Between November 2004 and May 2009, 306 patients met inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant difference in patencies among treatment groups (p=0.016), driven by laser having a significantly lower patency than the angioplasty/stent, Silverhawk atherectomy, and Viabahn endoluminal graft groups. Conclusions – Many of the expensive endovascular devices have poor patencies lasting less than six months. Angioplasty/stent is not inferior to these new devices, and may remain the standard of care.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectCLASE Studyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemoral Arteryen_US
dc.subject.meshEndovascular Proceduresen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorRodriguez, Julio, MDen_US
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