Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221390
Title:
Trends In Unintentional Drug Overdose-related Deaths
Author:
Sharer, Rustan
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
1-May-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Since undergoing a radical paradigm shift in prescribing trends in the late 80s/early 90s, the therapeutic use and non-therapeutic abuse of controlled prescription drugs (specifically opioids) has reached prolific levels in the US. Despite seemingly widespread awareness of such trends and associated dangers, mortality and morbidity associated with such medications continues to escalate in the face of rapidly increasing prescribing patterns. This investigation attempts to further characterize time trends of accidental deaths secondary to overdoses of various drugs (primarily comparing Arizona to national trends with respect to various demographic identifiers). Utilizing publicly available data sources, a statistical analysis was performed on yearly mortality rates for selected drug-overdose related causes of death between 1999 and 2007. Arizona consistently exhibited higher death rates--with Pinal County claiming the highest among all urbanizations--(but lower annual rates of increase) than the national trends. Men were also shown to have much higher death rates than women (although women’s rates are increasing much faster than men). Furthermore, Hispanics demonstrated significantly lower death rates than non-Hispanics (whose death rates were shown to be increasing three times faster than Hispanics). Rapidly increasing death rates pose a significant concern at both the state and national levels.
MeSH Subjects:
Drug Overdose
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Petitti, Diana, MD, MPH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTrends In Unintentional Drug Overdose-related Deathsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharer, Rustanen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince undergoing a radical paradigm shift in prescribing trends in the late 80s/early 90s, the therapeutic use and non-therapeutic abuse of controlled prescription drugs (specifically opioids) has reached prolific levels in the US. Despite seemingly widespread awareness of such trends and associated dangers, mortality and morbidity associated with such medications continues to escalate in the face of rapidly increasing prescribing patterns. This investigation attempts to further characterize time trends of accidental deaths secondary to overdoses of various drugs (primarily comparing Arizona to national trends with respect to various demographic identifiers). Utilizing publicly available data sources, a statistical analysis was performed on yearly mortality rates for selected drug-overdose related causes of death between 1999 and 2007. Arizona consistently exhibited higher death rates--with Pinal County claiming the highest among all urbanizations--(but lower annual rates of increase) than the national trends. Men were also shown to have much higher death rates than women (although women’s rates are increasing much faster than men). Furthermore, Hispanics demonstrated significantly lower death rates than non-Hispanics (whose death rates were shown to be increasing three times faster than Hispanics). Rapidly increasing death rates pose a significant concern at both the state and national levels.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Overdoseen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorPetitti, Diana, MD, MPHen_US
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