Prophylactic Dosing of Myofascial Release in a Human Fibroblast Model of Wound Closure

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221387
Title:
Prophylactic Dosing of Myofascial Release in a Human Fibroblast Model of Wound Closure
Author:
Powell, Travis Joseph
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
1-May-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Myofascial release (MFR) allows clinicians to directly stretch and palpate soft tissue restrictions, improving tissue elasticity, and maximizing range of motion. Research has focused on MFR following repetitive motion strain (RMS), however there is no known application of prophylactic MFR. Utilizing in vitro strain models we will investigate the role of prophylactic MFR in regulating fibroblast wound healing. We hypothesize that MFR treatments will have greater efficacy when used prior to the repetitive motion strain, increasing the rate of wound healing. Human fibroblasts were seeded onto 6-well collagen-I bioflex plates, strained with the Flexcell vacuum compression system. Sub-confluent cell constructs were wounded using sterile 1ml pipette tips to create an area devoid of cells. Spatial wound edge changes were monitored to determine closure rate at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours. Pooled data for 36 hours demonstrated that RMS closed 32% faster than the combined RMS+MFR and 30.5% faster than the non-strain control, p<0.05. This meant the data did not support the hypothesis, but prophylactic stretching has been shown to prevent and reduce injury in 5 other models. Prophylactic MFR requires additional studies to expand our model to include multiple dosed treatments with a stronger emphasis on prevention vs. healing.
Keywords:
Myofascial release
MeSH Subjects:
Fibroblasts; Wound Closure Techniques; Cumulative Trauma Disorders
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Standley, Paul, PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProphylactic Dosing of Myofascial Release in a Human Fibroblast Model of Wound Closureen_US
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Travis Josephen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractMyofascial release (MFR) allows clinicians to directly stretch and palpate soft tissue restrictions, improving tissue elasticity, and maximizing range of motion. Research has focused on MFR following repetitive motion strain (RMS), however there is no known application of prophylactic MFR. Utilizing in vitro strain models we will investigate the role of prophylactic MFR in regulating fibroblast wound healing. We hypothesize that MFR treatments will have greater efficacy when used prior to the repetitive motion strain, increasing the rate of wound healing. Human fibroblasts were seeded onto 6-well collagen-I bioflex plates, strained with the Flexcell vacuum compression system. Sub-confluent cell constructs were wounded using sterile 1ml pipette tips to create an area devoid of cells. Spatial wound edge changes were monitored to determine closure rate at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours. Pooled data for 36 hours demonstrated that RMS closed 32% faster than the combined RMS+MFR and 30.5% faster than the non-strain control, p<0.05. This meant the data did not support the hypothesis, but prophylactic stretching has been shown to prevent and reduce injury in 5 other models. Prophylactic MFR requires additional studies to expand our model to include multiple dosed treatments with a stronger emphasis on prevention vs. healing.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectMyofascial releaseen_US
dc.subject.meshFibroblastsen_US
dc.subject.meshWound Closure Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshCumulative Trauma Disordersen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorStandley, Paul, PhDen_US
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