A Comparison of Depression Screening Tools in Parkinson’s Disease and Normal Community Controls Using a Brain and Body Donation Database

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221349
Title:
A Comparison of Depression Screening Tools in Parkinson’s Disease and Normal Community Controls Using a Brain and Body Donation Database
Author:
Rosen, Amanda
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
1-May-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to review and compare a variety of depression inventories in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and normal controls (NC) to look for patterns or trends to help with clinical management of these patients. The study population consisted of subjects enrolled in a brain and body donation program who were receiving annual neurological and neuropsychiatric assessments. Statistical models were applied to the data to compare trends between screening tools, medications, and demographics. The frequency of depression was greater in PD cases than NC across the inventories. The greatest frequency of positive screens came from the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Because the NPI requires an informant to administer, and had the highest percent of positive screens in both PD and NC groups, this study suggests that a caregiver or partner may be a helpful addition in clinical practice during depression screening in elderly patients with and without PD.
Keywords:
Screening Tool
MeSH Subjects:
Parkinson Disease; Depression; Tissue and Organ Procurement
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Shill, Holly, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA Comparison of Depression Screening Tools in Parkinson’s Disease and Normal Community Controls Using a Brain and Body Donation Databaseen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosen, Amandaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to review and compare a variety of depression inventories in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and normal controls (NC) to look for patterns or trends to help with clinical management of these patients. The study population consisted of subjects enrolled in a brain and body donation program who were receiving annual neurological and neuropsychiatric assessments. Statistical models were applied to the data to compare trends between screening tools, medications, and demographics. The frequency of depression was greater in PD cases than NC across the inventories. The greatest frequency of positive screens came from the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Because the NPI requires an informant to administer, and had the highest percent of positive screens in both PD and NC groups, this study suggests that a caregiver or partner may be a helpful addition in clinical practice during depression screening in elderly patients with and without PD.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectScreening Toolen_US
dc.subject.meshParkinson Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressionen_US
dc.subject.meshTissue and Organ Procurementen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorShill, Holly, MDen_US
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