Focusing on the Patient Encounter to Improve Adult Immunization Rates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221345
Title:
Focusing on the Patient Encounter to Improve Adult Immunization Rates
Author:
Moore, David A.
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
1-May-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objective: Healthy People 2010 established target goals for the percentage of adults immunized against Pneumococcus and seasonal influenza. Our objective was to create a vaccine program to allow our family practice clinic to reach these goals. Methods: Initial chart review (n=50) determined our clinic’s baseline percentages for Pneumococcus and billing records identified the number of influenza vaccines administered the previous year. We developed a vaccine program focused on direct intervention and executed it in two six-month phases; the first focused on seasonal influenza, and the second targeted Pneumococcus. We determined program efficacy of phase one (influenza) via shot volume and phase two by measuring post-program vaccine percentages thru a second chart review (n=104). Results: Pneumococcal coverage for adults age ≥65 dropped from 47 to 39% [95% CI: 23-71% & 22-56%], well short of the Healthy 4 People 2010 target of 90%. We measured a 16% volume increase in the administration of the seasonal influenza vaccine. Significance: Vaccines have tangible and positive effects on patient health. Direct intervention is an effective method for physicians to improve vaccine percentages, but is costly and time consuming.
MeSH Subjects:
Immunization
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Birkholz, Karla, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFocusing on the Patient Encounter to Improve Adult Immunization Ratesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoore, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: Healthy People 2010 established target goals for the percentage of adults immunized against Pneumococcus and seasonal influenza. Our objective was to create a vaccine program to allow our family practice clinic to reach these goals. Methods: Initial chart review (n=50) determined our clinic’s baseline percentages for Pneumococcus and billing records identified the number of influenza vaccines administered the previous year. We developed a vaccine program focused on direct intervention and executed it in two six-month phases; the first focused on seasonal influenza, and the second targeted Pneumococcus. We determined program efficacy of phase one (influenza) via shot volume and phase two by measuring post-program vaccine percentages thru a second chart review (n=104). Results: Pneumococcal coverage for adults age ≥65 dropped from 47 to 39% [95% CI: 23-71% & 22-56%], well short of the Healthy 4 People 2010 target of 90%. We measured a 16% volume increase in the administration of the seasonal influenza vaccine. Significance: Vaccines have tangible and positive effects on patient health. Direct intervention is an effective method for physicians to improve vaccine percentages, but is costly and time consuming.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunizationen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorBirkholz, Karla, MDen_US
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